Tag Archives: women give

Alone We Can Do Little, Together We Can Do Much!

It is no secret that when women choose to work together, great feats can be accomplished. The Women’s Philanthropy Fund is a shining example of this. In 2008, the Amarillo Area Foundation and a group of highly motivated women established the Women’s Philanthropy Fund to demonstrate that by combining their contributions, they could provide solutions to ongoing challenges. Since 2009, 168 women have provided contributions totaling more than $475,000 and have granted $290,000 to 31 nonprofit organizations for the benefit of women, children, and families.

“The Women’s Philanthropy Fund is unique in its use of pooled funds to empower organizations to make new programs possible and take existing programs to the next level. Grants from the fund make real and lasting differences in the lives of women and children the Texas Panhandle,” states Carolina Walden, Women’s Philanthropy Fund Advisory Board member. And there are no signs of slowing down. Women’s Philanthropy Fund members hold a firm belief that women and children play a vital role in our community and empowering them is crucial to the wellbeing of the entire population of the Texas Panhandle. When one woman succeeds or one child prospers, everyone benefits.

Grant recipients are not the only people who benefit from the Women’s Philanthropy Fund. Each year, members of the Women’s Philanthropy Fund have the opportunity to come together and make the decision of which organizations will receive grants from the money these individual women have pooled together. Through this process, friendships are forged, experience is gained, and education about the needs in our area as well as the organizations that provide help is obtained. Lizzie Mason, Women’s Philanthropy Fund Advisory Board member, says it best, “The Women’s Philanthropy membership is made up of a dynamic group of women who want to do good in the Texas Panhandle. I love being a part of this group because we learn about so many different needs involving women and children in our community, and we actually help them!”

If you would like to make a difference and improve quality of life for women and children, we invite you to join us as a member in 2017 as we expand our voice throughout the Texas Panhandle. Women 39 and under can join with a Silver Membership for $500 annually. The Gold Membership is $1000 annually, and arrangements can be made for any membership to be paid out monthly. However, your charitable membership contribution is due by July 31, 2017, to allow voting on grants at the September 14th meeting. Please contact Amy Lovell, at 806-376-4521 or amy@aaf-hf.org with any questions. For further information, please visit our website at https://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/WPF.

If you would like to join now, CLICK HERE. After DESIGNATION, select Women’s Philanthropy Fund from the drop-down menu.

To view a list of organizations who have benefited from the Women’s Philanthropy Fund in the past, please Click Here.

She Gives: Lindsey Murphy

She_gives_graphic

Hello to all the She Giver’s out there. (We are talking to you too, men).

“She Givers” are both male and female readers interested in supporting the driven women in their lives who are dedicated to making a difference. We know there are lots of you out there because the readership for this new column continues to flourish with every edition. We are so pleased you are finding the topics and stories covered meaningful and even more pleased to share our interview with Lindsey Murphy with you in this third edition of the column.

Murphy, the Vice President of Marketing for Education Credit Union, was a top 20 under 40 honoree for 2015. In other words, she will may make you feel inadequate about all things you are not doing that you could be doing. So, for those of you who need a fire lit under you to complete those yearend goals, make sure to click “continue reading” below. For those of you interested in reading about a woman committed to living a life of deep fulfillment, purpose, and service, click “continue reading,” too. Murphy is such a delight and absolute treat to have as a guest this quarter.

Olivia Trabysh: You serve on five boards? Could you list them and explain how or why you chose to get involved with each of them?

Lindsey Murphy: It’s actually six now (laughs). I am on the board of (1) Martha’s Home; (2) Coffee Memorial Blood Center; (3) American Advertising Federation – Amarillo; (4) Canyon Chamber of Commerce; (5) Panhandle PBS; and (6) Arden Road PTA.

Growing up, my Mom’s heart was for blood donation. I was always in the waiting room at Coffee Memorial while she donated. I grew up watching her give. The second I turned 18 that’s what I did. My Dad had a passion for United Way. When he was involved with campaigns or fundraisers for them he would explain to me why he was involved and why we had to help. When I got a “big girl job” I immediately started donating to the United Way because that’s simply what I thought adults did. But the older I got the more aware I became about the many ways to be involved and give back.

My junior year in college I met Melissa Chapman-Smith, the then Executive Director of Martha’s Home. She helped shift my philanthropic mindset to include giving more than just monetarily. She opened my eyes to what it means to donate your time and understanding what donating your time affords. Donating money is important and always appreciated, but donating time is invaluable. (Laughs)… so when my daughter was two weeks old (emphasis on the two weeks old), I joined the Martha’s Home Board of Directors, because I have such a passion for homeless women and children.

The strategic planning and steering of a nonprofit organization does so much good. When my Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer, and after learning what I did on the Board at Martha’s Home, I couldn’t only donate blood in my Mom’s name anymore. I applied to be on the Board of Coffee Memorial in her honor.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

2015 was supposed to be the year of “no,” but it quickly became the year of “yes.” I joined each of the other boards I currently serve on, and they all deal with many different causes I am passionate about. I am constantly learning so much. But six is my limit.  Pro-tip: If you don’t know your limit, your family will tell you (laughs).

Trabysh: Serving on six nonprofit boards obviously takes up a significant amount of time. Why do you feel it is important to serve the community in addition to your job? And how does your employer assist you in being able to provide outreach to so many parts of the community?

Murphy: There’s just so much more out there to do other than your job. I grew up in the Sleepy Hollow area but applied to be a part of the magnet program at Sam Houston in middle school. I witnessed obvious class division and many differences from what I was accustomed to seeing on my side of town. I learned to love people as people. I just have a servant’s heart.

The Credit Union is incredibly supportive of the benevolent aspect of my personality. They are flexible and allow me to attend board meetings and events during the work day. They also monetarily support nonprofits organizations I am on the board of. The Credit Union supports all of the boards and causes our management team is involved with. They truly believe in the work each member of the management team does for our community and support our efforts.

In 2013-2014 I was given the opportunity to go through Leadership Amarillo and Canyon with my son. The Credit Union sponsored my training and sponsored my son’s, too. They normally sponsor training for a few employees and students in the community. It was really cool not only to receive the training, but to bond that way with my son doing something so profound and then be able to credit the experience to my employer.

Trabysh: That is such a cool thing for your employer to do and I think that is especially important for our younger working women or women contemplating a career change to hear. It is possible to work for an employer that is supportive of your passions and your family. So, time for some lightening round questions. Who are the people that support you the most?

Murphy: My husband! He is the kindest, most patient, loving man on the planet. He helps me find that even level of balance. I would not be able to do what I do if he wasn’t willing to help run our daughter to soccer practice and cheerleading. He also doesn’t mind throwing on a suit and tie to be “my arm candy” for the night to support causes and people I care about. He is always there to support me.

The precious Murphey family.

Murphy family

I really strive for volunteerism to be a way of life for our family. We make volunteer events a family affair. It’s also a way to get friends involved. I am able to spend quality time with people I love and also dedicate that time towards a great purpose. I guess I pass on that spirit of volunteerism to them like my parents did to me without even really meaning to.

Trabysh: Who are the people that inspire you the most?

Murphy: Melissa Chapman-Smith.  My parents – they are the foundation for all of this. Sallye Barnes. She will do anything. She’s the go-to-friend for hot glue parties and last minute dates.

The sheer amount of work that needs to be done inspires me.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha's Home Second Chance Prom.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha’s Home Second Chance Prom.

 

Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Trabysh: What matters the most to you?

Murphy: When I can go home and go to bed every night.  I can sleep soundly if I know I did a good job at work, I fulfilled the mission of whatever nonprofit organizations I served that day, and I spent quality time with my family. It’s a sense of accomplishment and love for my community and the people in it.

Trabysh: What are the causes that you think are in most-dire need of attention in our community?

Murphy: Homelessness is so urgent and so present; we can’t look the other way anymore. We must work together to fix it – it is not going away on its own.

I want to teach people to not to be so absorbed in their day to day lives.  A tiny little prick can save lives – so go donate blood! There are too many people who bury their heads in the sand and think our community’s struggles will magically take care of themselves. People must be willing to make things happen. If not me, than who?

The Amarillo Area Foundation Awards over $1 Million to Area Nonprofits

Grants

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

AMARILLO – The Board of Directors of the Amarillo Area Foundation, and its supporting organization The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation, have awarded $1,025,144 in grants with their general grantmaking funds.

The Amarillo Area Foundation has also awarded an additional $325, 446 this year through funds established by local industry employers such as CNS Pantex, and Pattern Panhandle Wind Energy. The Kathy Ryan family also awarded $30,000 to local firefighters to honor the anniversary of their mother’s passing.

Fourteen Amarillo area nonprofit organizations were approved for funding with discretionary grantmaking dollars. 57% of the projects supported in this grant cycle were capital projects. Among the capital projects supported is a $500,000 grant to Heal the City for renovations at the former Midtown Branch YMCA to create a usable room for wellness activities. The other 43% of projects supported were program based.

President and CEO, Clay Stribling said, “Our first discretionary grant cycle really emphasizes our commitment to various aspects of community health. Not only do we want to improve the physical health for our constituents, we also want to support healthy communities with healthy economies and nonprofit organizations.”

“Applications were accepted from nonprofit organizations from across the Panhandle. Proposals were then reviewed by Area Foundation staff and presented to the board for consideration,” said Katharyn Wiegand, Vice President of Community Engagement.

Visit amarilloareafoundation.org/grants for more information on upcoming grant cycles. For questions about eligibility or the grant process contact Kathie Grant, Grants Administrator at kathie@aaf-hf.org. For questions regarding Foundation priorities and focus areas, contact Jessica Tudyk, Grants Manager at jessica@aaf-hf.org . Both can also be reached at 806-376-4521.

The full list of recipients is available here.

 

About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle. Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver.

She Gives

_AFF_Spring_2016_Article-01

As I received my college degree and a donation letter from my alma mater on the same day last May, I remember initially thinking: “Can I please pay off the remaining balance of my student loans first?” But then the secondary thoughts that followed were: “How do I actually give charitably as an adult? Do I claim that on a tax return? When do I even give — after I establish myself? Or, do I give now because I am always going to have tiresome adult payments to make? I had an overwhelming plethora of thoughts, but not one of those thoughts were — “I do not want to give.” And I have a feeling that many women share similar generous sentiments to my own.

According to the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at Indiana University, single women give more than single men; women give across organizations while men give only to specific, individual organizations; and women give across all charitable sub-sectors except for sports and adult recreation. What those statistics tell me is women give, they give a lot, and they give in a lot of areas. Yet, I am fairly certain if you were to name the first philanthropist that comes to your mind at this moment, it would be a man.

I could refer back once again to my college education to provide an assortment of complex explanations as to why men are more readily identified as philanthropists. But I think that all of those nuanced theories would begin by applying the same practical solution to the non-academic world. That solution being that we all benefit when women’s contributions to society are appropriately recognized. When women’s contributions are properly acknowledged women don’t continue giving in search of recognition they should have already received. Instead, women give what is appropriate for their situation when their contributions are appropriately acknowledged and women continue to give because they wish to, not because they feel they must give to validate their identity or even past gifts they feel went unrecognized.

Jacki Zehner, Chief Engagement Officer of Women Moving Millions further articulates the generosity of women and the lack of female identity in philanthropy eloquently. “When we think about philanthropy, we often think of men. Yet, I’ve learned that women are more generous with their time and money at all ages and income levels. More and more women are also becoming ‘career philanthropists,’ dedicating vast resources to changing the world for the better. We need to hear their stories.”

So, in writing this piece and in search of more stories, I consulted with my colleague, Katharyn Wiegand, Vice President of Community Investment because she has been gracious enough to accessibly model what a young female philanthropist looks like for me.

I was most interested in tracing the lineage that led to Katharyn’s giving and the causes to which she gives. When I directly asked her who her female philanthropic role models were she had this to say: Continue reading

#WHYACE: Let’s Talk Logistics

College is expensive. We hear and read that every day on countless social media and news platforms. The numbers are staggering when you add up the cost of tuition, fees, books, plus room and board.

To help with some of that sticker shock, ACE covers a portion of college costs for Caprock, Palo Duro, and select Tascosa students attending either AC or WT. For a further explanation of why that is, refer back to last week’s blog, which you can do here

If you are already up to speed, let’s proceed! ACE specifically covers the costs of tuition, fees, and books at AC and WT.

You may be wondering what the current costs at AC and WT are. So we gathered that information for you.

The current cost of tuition, fees, and books at AC is $2,260 a semester.

The current cost of tuition, fees, and books at WT is $4,859 a semester.

However, ACE doesn’t pay that full amount for each ACE student every semester. ACE pays about $396 a semester for ACE students attending AC and $1,416 a semester for ACE students attending WT.

ACE pays a combined average of $783 per student a semester to attend either AC or WT.

If that combined average seems noticeably less than the costs listed above, that’s because it is. ACE only pays a fraction of the cost of tuition, fees, and books at AC and WT because filing for federal aid and scholarships is a requirement of the ACE program. The financial aid and scholarships ACE students receive cover a significant portion of their expenses, leaving ACE to supplement the remaining costs, which also allows substantially more students to benefit from the ACE program for many generations to come. Continue reading