Tag Archives: Grant Opportunity

The Heroic Legacy of Kathy Ryan


In the 2006 wildfires a hero, Kathy Ryan, lost her life.  As a tribute to their mother, Kathy’s children set up a fund at the Amarillo Area Foundation.  The goal of the fund is to provide grants to rural fire and rescue entities to increase fire education, allow for important equipment to be purchased or to expand work that is already taking place.  The Fund, established by the family of Kathy Ryan and the law firm of Lovell, Lovell, Isern, & Farabough and managed by the Amarillo Area Foundation, has given more than $50,000 in grants to deserving first responder organizations in the Texas Panhandle – excluding Potter and Randall counties.

Pamela Ayers and Tonya Griffin award a $10,000 grant to Chief Curtis Brown from the Dalhart Volunteer Fire Department.

2018 Grant Recipient

Today at the Amarillo Area Foundation offices, Kathy’s children were able to give a $10,000 grant to the Dalhart Volunteer Fire Department to help build a training facility for fire and rescue operations in Dallam, Hartley, and Sherman Counties.

How You Can Help!

If you would like to donate to the Kathy Ryan Fund, please CLICK HERE
(Choose Kathy Ryan Fund from the drop-down menu)         

More About Kathy Ryan

Here’s a look at the live video from this morning’s announcement and grant recipient.

 

Women’s Philanthropy Fund RFP

Women’s Philanthropy Fund – Competitive Grant Program

To transform the lives of women and children in the Texas Panhandle through fundraising, grantmaking, and advocacy. 

CLICK HERE for the 2017 Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Women’s Philanthropy Fund.

In 2008, the Amarillo Area Foundation and a group of highly motivated women established the Women’s Philanthropy Fund (WPF) to address the needs of women and children in the Texas Panhandle.  The donors are philanthropically motivated women who recognized that pooling contributions could help them unite to address the issues facing the women and children in our region in all areas of life. The WPF will focus on programs or projects assessed to have the highest possibility of a direct impact on the well-being of women and children in the Texas Panhandle.  The purpose of the fund is to:

  • Unite, serve, and empower women to become leaders in philanthropy
  • Enable contributors to have more direction and involvement in where their dollars are spent
  • Achieve greater impact by drawing on the collective wisdom of donors
  • Demonstrate the effect of how pooled donations can yield large scale, targeted grants
  • Enable innovative and compelling programs and projects that might otherwise not be possible
  • Research areas of need and strategically allocate funds to achieve the greatest impact
  • Address education, awareness, and participation in philanthropy

One of the main purposes of the Amarillo Area Foundation Women’s Philanthropy Fund is to connect, empower, and enrich women’s lives across the Panhandle. The fund awards annual grants through a competitive process to charitable organizations throughout the Texas Panhandle who serve women and/or children.

CLICK HERE for FUNDING HISTORY.

 

The Amarillo Area Foundation and The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation 2017 Request for Proposals

The Amarillo Area Foundation is now accepting applications for the Discretionary Grant (DG) and Catalyst Grant (CG) program. The application process is competitive and nonprofit organizations located within the top twenty-six counties of the Texas Panhandle are encouraged to apply.  Visit www.amarilloareafoundation.org/grants and click on “Foundation Grant Programs” for full information regarding both programs.

The DG program accepts grant requests of over $20,000 and the CG Program accepts grant requests between $2,500 to $20,000.  In addition to other eligibility criteria, an organization may only submit a grant application to the Amarillo Area Foundation once per twelve-month period and must choose to submit either a CG or a DG application.  

In 2017, the Discretionary/Catalyst grant cycles will be as follows: 

Applications Due

Board Review

March 1

April/May

June 30

August/September

November 1*

December*


*There will be a third Catalyst Grant cycle (November/December);

however, the third Discretionary Grant cycle will only be held if funds are available. 

Applications are available at aaf.spectrumportal.net and must be submitted through the online portal.  Please visit http://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/application-2016 to access more information about the Spectrum Portal and the application process.

Applicants are encouraged to contact Foundation staff to arrange an appointment to discuss the potential request or with questions. For more information about AAF or applying for grants call (806) 376-4521 or e-mail grants@aaf-hf.org.

 

Foundations Invest Over $8.7 Million in the Health of Panhandle Communities

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Honoring its mission to improve quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents, the Amarillo Area Foundation announces annual distributions totaling $8.7 million for 2016. With more than 450 grants, the Foundation is helping to continue the important work of nonprofit organizations in the 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The Harrington Regional Medical Campus had its first-ever grant cycle after joining the Amarillo Area Foundation in 2015.  Because of the collaborative and meaningful work of various community stakeholders, the Foundation and its public supporting organization – the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation – will invest:

$4.6 million into area communities through community fund, agency fund, and donor advised distributions;

$2 million in discretionary grants;

$1.2 million in scholarship distributions from the ACE and General Scholarship programs;

$676,000 in competitive grant programs including, CNS Pantex, Pattern Panhandle Wind, the Women’s Philanthropy Fund, the AAF Catalyst grant program, and the Kathy Ryan Memorial Fund;

$83,000 in grants from the Harrington Regional Medical Campus.

“The Amarillo Area Foundation and its supporting organizations are proud of what was accomplished by our staff and partners in 2016,” Clay Stribling, AAF CEO said. “We look forward to building on these accomplishments moving forward.”

In 2017, the Amarillo Area Foundation begins its 60th year and will continue supporting efforts that improve quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents. The strength and health of area communities continues to be the benchmark of success, and together with community support, this mission will be realized annually.

Toolbox for Fundraisers Class Recognized as an Asset by Local Nonprofits and Foundations

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For more than 20 years the Foundation has provided a platform for local fundraising professionals to share their expertise through a course originally titled “The Art of Fundraising”.  This year our 2016 “Toolbox for Fundraiser’s” cohort consists of 26 students from nonprofits across the Panhandle, six of which are sponsored to attend the 11-week course because of its dynamism and quality.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals Texas Plains Chapter sponsored two students representing Habit for Humanity and Word at Work. Teresa Hillman, current AFP President believes sponsoring professionals to take the class “is a natural fit” for AFP’s mission.  “Most of us in the nonprofit world understand that a fee for a class of this caliber is not always in our budget, especially if it is a small organization.  To help alleviate that cost, AFP is glad to help with scholarships. The Toolbox for Fundraisers class provides top quality fundraising advice and an upholds standards we adhere to as a profession,” says Hillman.

The Mary E. Bivins Foundation also sponsored Toolbox training for staff members from the Wesley Community Center as a component of a capacity building grant. Susan Severn, the Grants and Scholarships Program Officer at the Bivins Foundation says, “There are several ways to help a nonprofit move forward and make long-term sustainability plans. Whether that be board and staff training, or identifying and diversifying new sources of fundraising.” She states the reason they specifically provided funding for the Wesley Community Center is so that they can think creatively about how to cover the costs for their senior citizens’ program expenses. “The Wesley actually has quite a solid revenue model,” says Severn, “the challenge is that the population the Wesley serves through their senior program is often limited in terms of financial resources which makes covering those program costs more difficult.”

Students in this year’s Toolbox class are the recipients of over 88 years of combined fundraising knowledge from veteran fundraisers Charlotte Rhodes, Patricia A. Ward, and Katharyn Wiegand. Topics covered include: essential tools to be an effective fundraiser; establishing a development office; creating a case for support; constructing a development plan; marketing your organization; making the ask; stewarding donors; and preparing for the CFRE certification.

Participants who successfully complete the 33 hour course will receive 3.30 continuing education credits (CEUs) through Amarillo College.  This course also meets the requirements for those seeking credit hours for the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation. Upon successful completion of the course, each participant will have developed a case for support and a development plan for the organization of his/her choice.

The course fee is $250 for members of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and $295 for all others.

Fundraising can be a daunting task if you are not sure where to start or how to stay on track, especially as the number of nonprofit organizations competing for funding increases each year. Let us help put you on the track.

Contact Roxann Ball by phone at 806-376-4521 or by email at roxann@aaf-hf.org to ask about enrollment for next year’s course.

The AAF Community Health Foundation Awards $83,000 in Grants to Healthcare Projects throughout the Panhandle

 

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Tuesday, October 26, 2016

AMARILLO – The Board of Directors of the AAF Community Health Foundation, doing business as the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC), have awarded a total of $83,000 to seven nonprofit organizations and five institutions of higher learning in their first grant cycle.  HRMC is a supporting organization of the Amarillo Area Foundation and its mission is to promote quality of life in the Texas Panhandle through exceptional healthcare, education, and research.

The Amarillo Botanical Gardens, Don Harrington Discovery Center, and Ronald McDonald House are residents of the Harrington Medical Campus and received support for capital projects. Arrow Child & Family Ministries, Downtown Women’s Center, Hansford County Hospital District, and the West Texas A&M University Foundation received funds from the HRMC Community Health Grant Program for capital or program related expenses.

Full list of recipients is available here.

The Hansford County Hospital District received the largest grant. They were awarded $15,000 to certify Registered Nurses as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and train more EMTs in order to ensure that necessary staff are available and properly trained to transfer patients to a higher level of care when needed.  The project will reduce long Emergency Room transfer times and unnecessary transfers by flight.

Amarillo College, Clarendon Community College, Frank Phillips Community College, Texas Tech University, and West Texas A&M University received funds for scholarships to area students and professionals pursuing healthcare related education. Scholarship recipients must demonstrate a commitment to locate in the region and contribute to area communities.

Organizations may only submit one grant application per twelve month period to the HRMC Community Health Program; however, receiving an HRMC grant does not affect eligibility for Amarillo Area Foundation discretionary and other competitive grants. HRMC Grant Program applications are anticipated to reopen in the summer of 2017 and will be due at noon on September 1, 2017.

Please contact grants@aaf-hf.org or call 806-376-4521 with questions.

About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver

HRMC Grant Cycle Now Open

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Request for Proposals

The AAF Community Health Foundation, otherwise known as the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC), is proud to announce new grant programs.

The intent of the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC) Resident Grant Program and the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC) Community Health Grant Program is to improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare ultimately leading to an improved quality of life for residents of the top 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.

Both grant programs are competitive and proposals for healthcare related projects will be accepted from organizations that hold a current tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code; a recognized government entity: state, county, or city agency, including law enforcement or fire departments, that are requesting funds exclusively for public purposes; a K-12 public school, community/junior college, state college or university; or a church or other faith-based organization with a proposed project that benefits the community at large.

HRMC Resident Grant Program: The HRMC Board will accept grant applications from Medical Campus resident nonprofit institutions and other eligible organizations located in the Medical Campus for projects and capital improvements.  Preference will be given to Ronald McDonald House, Turn Center, Amarillo Botanical Gardens, Don Harrington Discovery Center, and Coffee Memorial Blood Center.   $21,000 is available and proposals for up to $20,000 will be accepted. High priority will be given to specific project-related proposals.  Operational support is a low priority.

HRMC Community Health Grant Program: The HRMC Board will accept grant proposals from eligible organizations located throughout the 26 county region.  $42,000 is available and proposals for up to $20,000 will be accepted.  High priority will be for specific project-related proposals as well as challenge and/or matching grants.  Proposals will be accepted for capital projects, capacity building, innovative projects, and research projects.  Operational support is a low priority.

Organizations may only submit one grant application per twelve month period; however, Medical Campus Residents may submit a grant application to both the HRMC Resident Grant Program and the HRMC Community Health Grant Program in the same year

The Amarillo Area Foundation will accept applications for both the HRMC Resident Grant program and the HRMC Community Health Grant Program until noon on Thursday, September 15, 2016.  Applications for both grant programs must be submitted through the Foundation’s online portal which can be accessed on the Internet at aaf.spectrumportal.net. Applications or parts of applications submitted in any other manner (paper, e-mail, etc.) will not be accepted.  For more information regarding the online application please see www.amarilloareafoundation.org/application-2016.

Selection Process Both grant programs are competitive. Applications will be reviewed by AAF staff for eligibility and completeness. The HRMC Board of Directors will review the applications and make funding decisions.

For information on how to apply go here: http://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/hrmc-grant-programs

Contact information Contact grants@aaf-hf.org or call 806.376.4521 with any questions.

Amarillo Area Foundation Request for Grant Proposals

CNS_Blog_headerFor Immediate Release: June 21, 2016

On behalf of Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, responsible for the management and operations of the Pantex Plant, the Amarillo Area Foundation (AAF) announces a Request for Proposals (RFP). The Advisory Committee for the CNS Pantex Community Investment Fund, a component fund of the Amarillo Area Foundation, will entertain proposals from nonprofit and charitable institutions throughout the twenty-six northernmost counties in the Texas Panhandle (individuals and non-charitable organizations are not eligible). Grant amounts will range from $2,500 to $10,000. The application process will be competitive. Organizations who fit the eligibility requirements and whose work is in line with the priorities are encouraged to apply. The priorities for funding are:

  • Basic Needs (Food, Clothing, and Shelter)
  • Children, Youth, and Family
  • Community Development
  • Education
  • Health and Wellness

Priority will be given to proposals from organizations located and operating in twelve contiguous counties surrounding the Pantex Plant. These counties include Deaf Smith, Oldham, Moore, Hutchison, Gray, Donley, Hall, Armstrong, Swisher, Randall, Potter, and Carson.

Applications are available online at aaf.spectrumportal.net and are due August 15, 2016 by 12:00 noon. See www.amarilloareafoundation.org/application-2016 for instructions on how to register in the Spectrum portal. If you have any questions about eligibility or the grant process, please contact Kathie Grant, Grants Administrator, at 806.376.4521 or kathie@aaf-hf.org. If you have any questions about priorities, please contact Jessica Tudyk, Grants Manager, at 806.376.4521 or jessica@aaf-hf.org. Anticipated timeline is below.

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The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The Foundation’s mission is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle. Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver.

#WHYACE: VOICES PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE

Blog_headerTo conclude our ACE series we thought we would celebrate graduation season by highlighting the voices of past and present ACE students, while also opening up the platform to the many future ACE students and supporters out there.

Representing the voice of ACE students past is Ms. Ersela Demerson, the original ACE graduate from Palo Duro High School’s Class of 1997. Ersela graduated ahead of her cohort in three years, the rest of her inaugural class graduated in 1998, making her literally the first ACE graduate.

AAF: Ersela, we think your ambition to graduate high school in three years embodies the driven spirit of ACE students, but in your own words can you describe for us what ACE means to you, and now as a leader in the Amarillo community, what you see it continuing to mean to students in the future?

Demerson: My situation wasn’t a stereotypical situation you might expect to hear about. Both of my parents were college educated, I grew up understanding the importance of education. For me, ACE solved an economic issue. My dad was a minister, and my mom was laid off at the time I graduated high school and was looking to go to college. So going to college was never a question, but how to pay for it was. I assumed I would have to probably take some time off during undergrad. But because of ACE I didn’t have to and I was able to go on after my bachelor’s and receive a master’s as well.

As far as what ACE means for students now and in the future I think it can be summarized as an opportunity for students to invest in themselves and their futures, while also receiving a sense of accomplishment for their work. ACE is a hand-up and not a handout. It may be a model stressing the importance of education and attendance for students not receiving that message at home, but more than anything, I think many students’ experiences were like my own and what they get from ACE is a phenomenal opportunity and a message of hope.

To see a video of Ersela where she talks about the importance of ACE click here

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Providing a voice for present ACE college students, is Makayla Ksor, a sophomore pursuing a degree in Fine Arts at Amarillo College. Unlike Ersela, Makayla’s parents did not attend university.

Ksor: ACE was always there when I needed assistance. I could always just email and make an appointment with an ACE advisor if I needed help figuring out the different aspects of being a college student. They also helped me in high school with deadlines and applications, managing expenses, which classes to take, and which college was best for me. Once in college I was even urged by ACE to become a part of a mentor program so that I could have an advisor with a major similar, if not the same to my own, who would understand my plight on a corresponding level. Yet, the biggest impact ACE has made in my college experience would be the financial support. The idea of student loans scared me.

AAF: Makayla, can you share with us what you wish others knew about ACE?

Ksor: When I ask students if they have ACE or not, most of them say that they lost their ACE in high school. I respond by asking, “Well, did you try to get it back by talking to an ACE advisor?” Usually, they just shrug and say, “No, it didn’t really matter to me.” It surprises me how many students would lose their ACE, not knowing how important it is to have or what it could do for them, or even just too afraid to ask about it. I feel like if students were more aware of what ACE really does for themselves and others they would care more about their own ACE and get the guidance they need.

Continue reading

#WHYACE: For the Peeples

Blog_headerThis week we are visiting with the 2015 Council of Chief State Officers Teacher of the Year, Ms. Shanna Peeples. CCSO Teacher of the Year is the oldest most prestigious national accolade of its kind. Since receiving the award, Peeples since spent the past year traveling the globe as an ambassador for education.

Peeples is a graduate of West Texas A&M University, an ACE network university, and an AP English teacher at one of our ACE schools, Palo Duro High School. We are delighted to interview Shanna and capture her thoughts on ACE.

AAF: So Shanna, as an award-winning educator, what do you see ACE doing for your students?

Peeples: I am grateful that ACE has an attendance requirement because research strongly supports the correlation between a student just being in school and that student’s probability of graduating. It’s hard to overstate how much low-income students struggle with the demands of helping their families pay the bills. These demands can take the shape of time spent caring for siblings or other family members while the parent or guardian is at work, or in the form of work to help pay household bills. Or both. Those who are blessed with not having to make the choice between these kinds of demands and school attendance may have a hard time understanding the pressures faced by students who grow up in poverty. For many high school students in poverty, life is a constant cost-benefit analysis: what is worth more? Keeping my family on track or going to school today? ACE, in a very concrete sense, helps students see the benefits of education.

AAF: You’ve done a ton of traveling over the last year advocating for education. In your travels, have you recognized or heard about programs similar to ACE?

Peeples: I’ve not heard about programs similar to ACE in the way it is so broad-based and open to so many students.

AAF: One of the belief statements of AISD is that “education is the equalizer in our society and that our schools can and should provide a culture of hope for all children.” How do you see ACE contributing to that belief statement for students?

Peeples: Here’s the thing: hope is not an abstraction. Hope is built by the actions and the attitudes around us. That’s how I translate the belief statement. The use of the word “can” implies that what we do every day in our classrooms builds hope. And the word “should” means that it’s a moral decision to create that hope. What we choose to do or what we choose to neglect has consequences. This foundation of hope depends on our community to reflect the message to every child that they matter, that they have value, and that we expect them to take their places in our neighborhoods as citizens. ACE contributes to the belief with a solid plan for every student to meet those expectations in the way of financial help for college.

AAF: What do you wish our community knew about ACE?

Peeples: I want Amarillo to be proud of the fact that we have programs like ACE that are just plain smart economics. For every dollar we invest in education, we get triple in return, according to data from California State University. College graduates not only return millions of dollars to the state, but they tend to be healthier, have more stable relationships, and volunteer at higher rates – all quality of life indicators that make a city attractive to outside investors.

AAF: Triple the return, we’ll conclude on that note. It’s been an honor, we appreciate you taking the time to speak with us.

Peeples: Thank you for letting me speak about a subject I love: education!

That is all for this week. Join us next week, on the eve of AISD graduation, as we conclude our series with the voices of ACE students past and present.

Till next week!

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