Category Archives: Harrington Foundation

Granting Success: Amarillo College

Below is a reposted blog from our friends at Amarillo College. When a grant is approved by our governing board, it becomes a partnership with the organization who receives the grant. Organizations do incredible work in the Texas Panhandle, and below is what can happen when it all comes together.

Amarillo College was looking to expand its East Campus programs and looked to the Amarillo Area Foundation to help become a nationally accredited program.

AC’s Automotive Technology program achieves national accreditation

By Joe Wyatt

Amarillo College is pleased to announce that its Automotive Technology program has achieved accreditation by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) in the category of Automobile Service Technology.

pictured are, from left, Isaac Bernal, interim program coordinator, Brian Jacob, retiring program director, and Rebecca Archer, executive secretary for the AC program.

To receive ASE accreditation, the College had to demonstrate that it meets all the rigorous standards set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation.

Additionally, AC underwent an on-site evaluation last fall that more than satisfied an independent committee, which closely examined the program’s course syllabi, sequence of instruction, and program training facilities, materials and faculty.

Students who study automotive technology at AC are now entitled to sit for computer-based ASE certification exams that align with industry standards and demonstrate to potential employers the level of expertise they have achieved.

“This is really exciting. Our students deserve this,” Isaac Bernal, AC’s interim program coordinator, said. “ASE accreditation gives our students the opportunity to achieve certifications that show employers how knowledgeable and dedicated to the field they are.

“We hold ourselves to a very high standard, so it makes sense that we would pursue a level of accreditation that similarly benefits our students, our industry partners and, ultimately, our entire automobile-driving community.”

Bernal and Brian Jacob, the longtime program coordinator who will retire this month, spearheaded the accreditation effort, with administrative support from Michael Kitten, dean of technical education, and David Hall, associate dean of technical education.

The entire process took about a year and a half, they said, and the new accreditation runs through 2023.

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence was established in 1972 as a nonprofit organization to help improve the quality of automotive service and repair through the voluntary testing and certification of automotive technicians and parts specialists.

Today, there are approximately a quarter of a million ASE certified professionals at work in dealerships, independent shops, collision repair shops, auto parts stores, fleets, schools and colleges throughout the country.

Here’s the link to the original post: CLICK HERE

The Power of a Grant

The Panhandle of Texas is a beautiful place full of open spaces and the best sunsets you’ve ever seen.  The 26-county area is also known to have more head of cattle than people.  The mostly rural landscape presents challenges when you begin to talk about student access to training for careers.  School districts in our rural communities have limited resources available for students to pursue studies in the area of healthcare.

The costs of implementing programs in healthcare are often too much for a rural school district to facilitate.  Lack of funding creates a problem for students to get clinical experience and familiarity in healthcare.  These issues persist while shortages of healthcare workers exist nation-wide.

There has to be a better way!  Thanks to the Coalition of Health Services, Amarillo ISD’s AACAL campus, and SimCentral there is a solution to these challenges.  Using technology to give students access to the training needed for in-demand careers is exactly the type of project that the Amarillo Area Foundation funds.

Here’s a look at the impact of this grant:

Amarillo Area Foundation/ The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation 2018 REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS

Each year, the Amarillo Area Foundation (AAF) and its supporting organization, The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation (HF), consider grant requests from public charities located within the northernmost 26 counties of Texas.  The application process is competitive and nonprofit organizations located within the Texas Panhandle are encouraged to apply. (Individuals and noncharitable agencies are not eligible to apply for funding.) Grant applications are considered by the Amarillo Area Foundation and its supporting organization, The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation, via a single application. The Harrington Foundation does not receive grant requests directly from nonprofit organizations.  Visit www.amarilloareafoundation.org/grants and click on “Foundation Grant Programs” for history, guidelines, eligibility, exclusions, priorities, focus areas, and additional information.

The Amarillo Area Foundation will accept proposals for the Discretionary Grant (DG) program and the Catalyst Grant (CG) Program.  The DG program accepts grant requests of over $20,000 and the CG Program accepts grant requests between $2,500 to $20,000An organization may only submit a grant application to the Amarillo Area Foundation once per twelve-month period and must choose to submit either a CG application or a DG application.  In addition, any reporting requirements of a previous DG or CG must be fulfilled before an organization is eligible to apply. The deadlines for both programs is at 12:00 noon on the dates below.

In 2018, the Discretionary/Catalyst grant cycles will be as follows:

Applications Due Board Review
March 1 April/May
June 29 August/September
October 26* December*

 *There will be an October 26th application deadline for the Catalyst Grant program;

however, the third Discretionary Grant cycle will only be held if funds are available.

DG applications will be reviewed by AAF staff and presented to the Board of Directors for consideration.  A committee comprised of community members aged 45 and younger from across the Texas Panhandle will review applications for the CG Program and then make funding recommendations to the AAF Board.

Applications are available at aaf.spectrumportal.net and must be submitted through the online portal.  Please visit http://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/application-2016 to access more information about the Spectrum Portal and the application process. Upon submission, applications and accompanying materials become the property of the Foundation and are used as deemed appropriate.  These materials may be reviewed with others as part of the assessment process.  Information may also be shared with other foundations and funding sources that call for information about community projects.

 Applicants are encouraged to contact Foundation staff to arrange an appointment to discuss the potential request or with questions. For more information about the Amarillo Area Foundation or about applying for grants e-mail grants@aaf-hf.org or call 806.376.4521.

Sybil Harrington Day, October 13th

Early Life

A native of Amarillo, Sybil Harrington was the granddaughter of Amarillo pioneers Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Hughes and the daughter of the late Frank and Roxy Buckingham.

In 1935, she married Donald D. Harrington, a legend in the booming Texas oil and gas industry.

The Arts

In their travels, the Harringtons enjoyed collecting art. They sought out works by Matisse, Renoir, Chagall, Pissarro, Monet and Cassatt before most collectors recognized their value.

Mrs. Harrington donated a portion of the collection to the Phoenix Museum of Art. Her historic home at 1600 S. Polk now operates as a house museum with a collection of decorative arts and furnishings.

Her devotion to the arts continued with her gifts to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City and the Juilliard School of Music.

She supported all facets of the visual and performing arts with her gifts, including support for the Amarillo Symphony and Lone Star Ballet production of “The Nutcracker” every Christmas and production of the musical drama “Texas” in Palo Duro Canyon.

She funded $1.2 million in scholarships at West Texas A&M University. The school’s board of regents dedicated the Sybil B. Harrington School of Arts and Humanities on the Canyon campus in 1989 to honor her.

The school also bestowed its first honorary doctorate on her in 1994.

Charity

The Harrington name became synonymous with every successful charitable and cultural endeavor throughout the Texas Panhandle. It appears on the regional medical center, numerous medical facilities and several of the headquarters of non-profit agencies in honor of gifts Mrs. Harrington made personally or through the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation. After her husband’s death in 1974, she became president of the foundation. The foundation continues to make grants to organizations throughout the Panhandle as part of the Amarillo Area Foundation.

The Boy Scouts honored her with the council’s first James E. West award in 1994 to recognize her support.

Legacy

In 1983, Amarillo declared Oct. 13 as Sybil Harrington Day to honor her on her birthday. The Amarillo Globe-News listed contributions from her and the foundation to 89 Amarillo organizations and agencies.

The Harrington Library Consortium links academic and public libraries throughout the Panhandle.

Mrs. Harrington’s gifts of almost $17.5 million made the Don and Sybil Harrington Cancer Center possible. The medical center became the Harrington Regional Medical Center in 1990 to recognize her personal contributions and grants.

To support higher education, she established the Sybil B. Harrington Scholarship Fund of the Amarillo College Foundation.

The University of Texas received a gift of oil and gas properties from the Harrington Foundation worth $4.35 million, plus a gift of $1.5 million in 1992.

Mrs. Harrington died Sept. 17, 1998.

The Amarillo Area Foundation and The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation 2017 Request for Proposals

The Amarillo Area Foundation is now accepting applications for the Discretionary Grant (DG) and Catalyst Grant (CG) program. The application process is competitive and nonprofit organizations located within the top twenty-six counties of the Texas Panhandle are encouraged to apply.  Visit www.amarilloareafoundation.org/grants and click on “Foundation Grant Programs” for full information regarding both programs.

The DG program accepts grant requests of over $20,000 and the CG Program accepts grant requests between $2,500 to $20,000.  In addition to other eligibility criteria, an organization may only submit a grant application to the Amarillo Area Foundation once per twelve-month period and must choose to submit either a CG or a DG application.  

In 2017, the Discretionary/Catalyst grant cycles will be as follows: 

Applications Due

Board Review

March 1

April/May

June 30

August/September

November 1*

December*


*There will be a third Catalyst Grant cycle (November/December);

however, the third Discretionary Grant cycle will only be held if funds are available. 

Applications are available at aaf.spectrumportal.net and must be submitted through the online portal.  Please visit http://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/application-2016 to access more information about the Spectrum Portal and the application process.

Applicants are encouraged to contact Foundation staff to arrange an appointment to discuss the potential request or with questions. For more information about AAF or applying for grants call (806) 376-4521 or e-mail grants@aaf-hf.org.

 

Foundations Invest Over $8.7 Million in the Health of Panhandle Communities

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Honoring its mission to improve quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents, the Amarillo Area Foundation announces annual distributions totaling $8.7 million for 2016. With more than 450 grants, the Foundation is helping to continue the important work of nonprofit organizations in the 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The Harrington Regional Medical Campus had its first-ever grant cycle after joining the Amarillo Area Foundation in 2015.  Because of the collaborative and meaningful work of various community stakeholders, the Foundation and its public supporting organization – the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation – will invest:

$4.6 million into area communities through community fund, agency fund, and donor advised distributions;

$2 million in discretionary grants;

$1.2 million in scholarship distributions from the ACE and General Scholarship programs;

$676,000 in competitive grant programs including, CNS Pantex, Pattern Panhandle Wind, the Women’s Philanthropy Fund, the AAF Catalyst grant program, and the Kathy Ryan Memorial Fund;

$83,000 in grants from the Harrington Regional Medical Campus.

“The Amarillo Area Foundation and its supporting organizations are proud of what was accomplished by our staff and partners in 2016,” Clay Stribling, AAF CEO said. “We look forward to building on these accomplishments moving forward.”

In 2017, the Amarillo Area Foundation begins its 60th year and will continue supporting efforts that improve quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents. The strength and health of area communities continues to be the benchmark of success, and together with community support, this mission will be realized annually.

Toolbox for Fundraisers Class Recognized as an Asset by Local Nonprofits and Foundations

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For more than 20 years the Foundation has provided a platform for local fundraising professionals to share their expertise through a course originally titled “The Art of Fundraising”.  This year our 2016 “Toolbox for Fundraiser’s” cohort consists of 26 students from nonprofits across the Panhandle, six of which are sponsored to attend the 11-week course because of its dynamism and quality.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals Texas Plains Chapter sponsored two students representing Habit for Humanity and Word at Work. Teresa Hillman, current AFP President believes sponsoring professionals to take the class “is a natural fit” for AFP’s mission.  “Most of us in the nonprofit world understand that a fee for a class of this caliber is not always in our budget, especially if it is a small organization.  To help alleviate that cost, AFP is glad to help with scholarships. The Toolbox for Fundraisers class provides top quality fundraising advice and an upholds standards we adhere to as a profession,” says Hillman.

The Mary E. Bivins Foundation also sponsored Toolbox training for staff members from the Wesley Community Center as a component of a capacity building grant. Susan Severn, the Grants and Scholarships Program Officer at the Bivins Foundation says, “There are several ways to help a nonprofit move forward and make long-term sustainability plans. Whether that be board and staff training, or identifying and diversifying new sources of fundraising.” She states the reason they specifically provided funding for the Wesley Community Center is so that they can think creatively about how to cover the costs for their senior citizens’ program expenses. “The Wesley actually has quite a solid revenue model,” says Severn, “the challenge is that the population the Wesley serves through their senior program is often limited in terms of financial resources which makes covering those program costs more difficult.”

Students in this year’s Toolbox class are the recipients of over 88 years of combined fundraising knowledge from veteran fundraisers Charlotte Rhodes, Patricia A. Ward, and Katharyn Wiegand. Topics covered include: essential tools to be an effective fundraiser; establishing a development office; creating a case for support; constructing a development plan; marketing your organization; making the ask; stewarding donors; and preparing for the CFRE certification.

Participants who successfully complete the 33 hour course will receive 3.30 continuing education credits (CEUs) through Amarillo College.  This course also meets the requirements for those seeking credit hours for the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation. Upon successful completion of the course, each participant will have developed a case for support and a development plan for the organization of his/her choice.

The course fee is $250 for members of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and $295 for all others.

Fundraising can be a daunting task if you are not sure where to start or how to stay on track, especially as the number of nonprofit organizations competing for funding increases each year. Let us help put you on the track.

Contact Roxann Ball by phone at 806-376-4521 or by email at roxann@aaf-hf.org to ask about enrollment for next year’s course.

The AAF Community Health Foundation Awards $83,000 in Grants to Healthcare Projects throughout the Panhandle

 

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Tuesday, October 26, 2016

AMARILLO – The Board of Directors of the AAF Community Health Foundation, doing business as the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC), have awarded a total of $83,000 to seven nonprofit organizations and five institutions of higher learning in their first grant cycle.  HRMC is a supporting organization of the Amarillo Area Foundation and its mission is to promote quality of life in the Texas Panhandle through exceptional healthcare, education, and research.

The Amarillo Botanical Gardens, Don Harrington Discovery Center, and Ronald McDonald House are residents of the Harrington Medical Campus and received support for capital projects. Arrow Child & Family Ministries, Downtown Women’s Center, Hansford County Hospital District, and the West Texas A&M University Foundation received funds from the HRMC Community Health Grant Program for capital or program related expenses.

Full list of recipients is available here.

The Hansford County Hospital District received the largest grant. They were awarded $15,000 to certify Registered Nurses as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and train more EMTs in order to ensure that necessary staff are available and properly trained to transfer patients to a higher level of care when needed.  The project will reduce long Emergency Room transfer times and unnecessary transfers by flight.

Amarillo College, Clarendon Community College, Frank Phillips Community College, Texas Tech University, and West Texas A&M University received funds for scholarships to area students and professionals pursuing healthcare related education. Scholarship recipients must demonstrate a commitment to locate in the region and contribute to area communities.

Organizations may only submit one grant application per twelve month period to the HRMC Community Health Program; however, receiving an HRMC grant does not affect eligibility for Amarillo Area Foundation discretionary and other competitive grants. HRMC Grant Program applications are anticipated to reopen in the summer of 2017 and will be due at noon on September 1, 2017.

Please contact grants@aaf-hf.org or call 806-376-4521 with questions.

About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver

She Gives: Lindsey Murphy

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Hello to all the She Giver’s out there. (We are talking to you too, men).

“She Givers” are both male and female readers interested in supporting the driven women in their lives who are dedicated to making a difference. We know there are lots of you out there because the readership for this new column continues to flourish with every edition. We are so pleased you are finding the topics and stories covered meaningful and even more pleased to share our interview with Lindsey Murphy with you in this third edition of the column.

Murphy, the Vice President of Marketing for Education Credit Union, was a top 20 under 40 honoree for 2015. In other words, she will may make you feel inadequate about all things you are not doing that you could be doing. So, for those of you who need a fire lit under you to complete those yearend goals, make sure to click “continue reading” below. For those of you interested in reading about a woman committed to living a life of deep fulfillment, purpose, and service, click “continue reading,” too. Murphy is such a delight and absolute treat to have as a guest this quarter.

Olivia Trabysh: You serve on five boards? Could you list them and explain how or why you chose to get involved with each of them?

Lindsey Murphy: It’s actually six now (laughs). I am on the board of (1) Martha’s Home; (2) Coffee Memorial Blood Center; (3) American Advertising Federation – Amarillo; (4) Canyon Chamber of Commerce; (5) Panhandle PBS; and (6) Arden Road PTA.

Growing up, my Mom’s heart was for blood donation. I was always in the waiting room at Coffee Memorial while she donated. I grew up watching her give. The second I turned 18 that’s what I did. My Dad had a passion for United Way. When he was involved with campaigns or fundraisers for them he would explain to me why he was involved and why we had to help. When I got a “big girl job” I immediately started donating to the United Way because that’s simply what I thought adults did. But the older I got the more aware I became about the many ways to be involved and give back.

My junior year in college I met Melissa Chapman-Smith, the then Executive Director of Martha’s Home. She helped shift my philanthropic mindset to include giving more than just monetarily. She opened my eyes to what it means to donate your time and understanding what donating your time affords. Donating money is important and always appreciated, but donating time is invaluable. (Laughs)… so when my daughter was two weeks old (emphasis on the two weeks old), I joined the Martha’s Home Board of Directors, because I have such a passion for homeless women and children.

The strategic planning and steering of a nonprofit organization does so much good. When my Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer, and after learning what I did on the Board at Martha’s Home, I couldn’t only donate blood in my Mom’s name anymore. I applied to be on the Board of Coffee Memorial in her honor.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

2015 was supposed to be the year of “no,” but it quickly became the year of “yes.” I joined each of the other boards I currently serve on, and they all deal with many different causes I am passionate about. I am constantly learning so much. But six is my limit.  Pro-tip: If you don’t know your limit, your family will tell you (laughs).

Trabysh: Serving on six nonprofit boards obviously takes up a significant amount of time. Why do you feel it is important to serve the community in addition to your job? And how does your employer assist you in being able to provide outreach to so many parts of the community?

Murphy: There’s just so much more out there to do other than your job. I grew up in the Sleepy Hollow area but applied to be a part of the magnet program at Sam Houston in middle school. I witnessed obvious class division and many differences from what I was accustomed to seeing on my side of town. I learned to love people as people. I just have a servant’s heart.

The Credit Union is incredibly supportive of the benevolent aspect of my personality. They are flexible and allow me to attend board meetings and events during the work day. They also monetarily support nonprofits organizations I am on the board of. The Credit Union supports all of the boards and causes our management team is involved with. They truly believe in the work each member of the management team does for our community and support our efforts.

In 2013-2014 I was given the opportunity to go through Leadership Amarillo and Canyon with my son. The Credit Union sponsored my training and sponsored my son’s, too. They normally sponsor training for a few employees and students in the community. It was really cool not only to receive the training, but to bond that way with my son doing something so profound and then be able to credit the experience to my employer.

Trabysh: That is such a cool thing for your employer to do and I think that is especially important for our younger working women or women contemplating a career change to hear. It is possible to work for an employer that is supportive of your passions and your family. So, time for some lightening round questions. Who are the people that support you the most?

Murphy: My husband! He is the kindest, most patient, loving man on the planet. He helps me find that even level of balance. I would not be able to do what I do if he wasn’t willing to help run our daughter to soccer practice and cheerleading. He also doesn’t mind throwing on a suit and tie to be “my arm candy” for the night to support causes and people I care about. He is always there to support me.

The precious Murphey family.

Murphy family

I really strive for volunteerism to be a way of life for our family. We make volunteer events a family affair. It’s also a way to get friends involved. I am able to spend quality time with people I love and also dedicate that time towards a great purpose. I guess I pass on that spirit of volunteerism to them like my parents did to me without even really meaning to.

Trabysh: Who are the people that inspire you the most?

Murphy: Melissa Chapman-Smith.  My parents – they are the foundation for all of this. Sallye Barnes. She will do anything. She’s the go-to-friend for hot glue parties and last minute dates.

The sheer amount of work that needs to be done inspires me.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha's Home Second Chance Prom.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha’s Home Second Chance Prom.

 

Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Trabysh: What matters the most to you?

Murphy: When I can go home and go to bed every night.  I can sleep soundly if I know I did a good job at work, I fulfilled the mission of whatever nonprofit organizations I served that day, and I spent quality time with my family. It’s a sense of accomplishment and love for my community and the people in it.

Trabysh: What are the causes that you think are in most-dire need of attention in our community?

Murphy: Homelessness is so urgent and so present; we can’t look the other way anymore. We must work together to fix it – it is not going away on its own.

I want to teach people to not to be so absorbed in their day to day lives.  A tiny little prick can save lives – so go donate blood! There are too many people who bury their heads in the sand and think our community’s struggles will magically take care of themselves. People must be willing to make things happen. If not me, than who?

Bryan Clontz on Creative Charitable Planning

2016_newsletter_q3_creativeImagine being able to increase the size of the gifts from your donors each year. Yet, the net cost of their donations were 40-60% less than what they were giving to you. Essentially, your programs and operations are secure from increased donations and your donors keep more money in their pockets. Sound too good to be true?

It’s actually not, and surprisingly the ability to maximize charitable gifts in such a monumental way is a tactic of the past. Non-cash assets have been incentivized by the government since 1969 but very few people understand what they are or how they work.

To better explain the concept for the benefit of Amarillo Area nonprofits and all the constituents they organizations serve, the Amarillo Area Foundation and the Amarillo Area Estate Planning Council teamed up to bring in charitable expert Bryan Clontz to help decode this mystery.

Clontz, President of Charitable Solutions, LLC spent the morning with nonprofit professionals. He taught them what non-cash assets were and how to ask for and incorporate non-cash assets (ideally appreciated stock) into their planned giving models. Clontz then opened the afternoon with a session for financial planners, CPAs, and attorneys. By informing the people who advise large donors in our area, we are increasing awareness related to the benefits associated with giving non-cash assets which maximize contributions to our area and the impact those contributions have.

Clontz closed the day with a special presentation to the AAF Board of Directors teaching members their role as key stakeholders and empowering them to act as extensions of the Foundation when asking for non-cash assets and even consider giving non-cash assets of their own.

Thanks to Clontz we all have plenty of information to take back to our organizations and communities. Now working together more informed and smarter, empowered to even further improve quality for Texas Panhandle residents.

Bryan Clontz speaking to nonprofit professionals on October 6, 2016.

Bryan Clontz speaking to nonprofit professionals at the Foundation on October 6, 2016.

If you missed the event and are interested in learning more about what Bryan had to say, check out this brief video posted by our friends at the Gulf Coast Community Foundation:

To further your knowledge on the realm of non-cash donations you can also check out Bryan’s website: http://charitablesolutionsllc.com/