NLNE The Partners: West Texas A&M Univesity

No Limits No Excuses: How did WTAMU get involved with No Limits, No Excuses?

West Texas A&M University: My understanding is that James Hallmark – who was the Provost at the time – had been involved with Amarillo Area Foundation and Panhandle 2020 and he was the first to hook in to what is now No Limits, No Excuses. I think they called it PPS at the time. So, he was the Provost and I was the Associate Provost, and he knew that I had been involved in  P16 initiatives for a while as a faculty member and so he asked me to start attending the meetings, and shortly after that, he left the university to go to College Station and I became the Provost.

But by that time, I think I knew enough about it that we had to be involved and  it’s something I feel strongly and passionate about, so rather than delegate it to someone else, I tried to maintain my role there. We’ve had several other people who have been involved in it as well.

 

NLNE:  What’s kept WT’s involvement during the five-plus years since No Limits, No Excuses has started?

WT: Well, I think you have to step back and look at the big picture. First of all, we’re an educational institution and so, educational attainment and providing people with high quality higher education, that’s the core mission of what we are. No Limits, No Excuses, even though it moves in lots of different directions, it looks at poverty, it looks at job training and all these other things, at its core it’s still about increasing the educational attainment of the region that we’re located in.

 

We can only thrive, we can only grow if the area that we’re located in is thriving and growing as well, and so in a sense, that’s maybe self-serving because a strong Panhandle means a strong WT. But more importantly, it’s what we’re put here to do. It’s our goal. It’s our mission. It’s to reach as many people in the area as we can and provide them with educational opportunities, and I think to partner with Amarillo College, to partner with AISD, to partner with business and to integrate ourselves into the community even more strongly than we already are.

 

NLNE: How has the partnership increased your relationship with other institutions?

WT: I guess I’ll answer that in two parts. Personally, I have gained such a broader understanding of how Amarillo College operates, the leadership there, their mission and certainly, the same is true of AISD. For a lot of people at the university, we don’t have to think very much or very hard about the independent school districts that are in the region.

I always joke about college professors who think that their students drop from the heavens on the first day of class, and don’t have any prior experience or knowledge. So, to learn about the issues facing them, to learn for instance, about the level of poverty, the number of children who are on free and reduced lunches, to learn about the breadth of programming that Amarillo College has.

All that is knowledge that I carry to meetings that I have on campus when we talk about, what’s our goal, what’s our vision, how do we connect with these people? It just provides me with the breadth of knowledge I didn’t have, and then connections, quite honestly, to important people like Russell Lowery-Hart and Dana West. I would probably not move in those circles otherwise if I didn’t have this connection.

As an institution, I think that the answer is also very similar. I try to share that information as I said, in meetings when I’m with the deans, when I’m with the President, when I’m with other people, to either clarify things or to point out chances for us to partner, or chances for us to work on a common initiative. Dr. Wendler is very open and very interested in those sorts of things, so I think that will pick up some steam now that he’s assumed his leadership role here on campus. Continue reading

Sybil Harrington Day, October 13th

Early Life

A native of Amarillo, Sybil Harrington was the granddaughter of Amarillo pioneers Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Hughes and the daughter of the late Frank and Roxy Buckingham.

In 1935, she married Donald D. Harrington, a legend in the booming Texas oil and gas industry.

The Arts

In their travels, the Harringtons enjoyed collecting art. They sought out works by Matisse, Renoir, Chagall, Pissarro, Monet and Cassatt before most collectors recognized their value.

Mrs. Harrington donated a portion of the collection to the Phoenix Museum of Art. Her historic home at 1600 S. Polk now operates as a house museum with a collection of decorative arts and furnishings.

Her devotion to the arts continued with her gifts to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City and the Juilliard School of Music.

She supported all facets of the visual and performing arts with her gifts, including support for the Amarillo Symphony and Lone Star Ballet production of “The Nutcracker” every Christmas and production of the musical drama “Texas” in Palo Duro Canyon.

She funded $1.2 million in scholarships at West Texas A&M University. The school’s board of regents dedicated the Sybil B. Harrington School of Arts and Humanities on the Canyon campus in 1989 to honor her.

The school also bestowed its first honorary doctorate on her in 1994.

Charity

The Harrington name became synonymous with every successful charitable and cultural endeavor throughout the Texas Panhandle. It appears on the regional medical center, numerous medical facilities and several of the headquarters of non-profit agencies in honor of gifts Mrs. Harrington made personally or through the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation. After her husband’s death in 1974, she became president of the foundation. The foundation continues to make grants to organizations throughout the Panhandle as part of the Amarillo Area Foundation.

The Boy Scouts honored her with the council’s first James E. West award in 1994 to recognize her support.

Legacy

In 1983, Amarillo declared Oct. 13 as Sybil Harrington Day to honor her on her birthday. The Amarillo Globe-News listed contributions from her and the foundation to 89 Amarillo organizations and agencies.

The Harrington Library Consortium links academic and public libraries throughout the Panhandle.

Mrs. Harrington’s gifts of almost $17.5 million made the Don and Sybil Harrington Cancer Center possible. The medical center became the Harrington Regional Medical Center in 1990 to recognize her personal contributions and grants.

To support higher education, she established the Sybil B. Harrington Scholarship Fund of the Amarillo College Foundation.

The University of Texas received a gift of oil and gas properties from the Harrington Foundation worth $4.35 million, plus a gift of $1.5 million in 1992.

Mrs. Harrington died Sept. 17, 1998.

The Art of Tape

Our friends at the Citadelle Art Foundation in Canadian have quite an exciting event coming up for the month of October.  Tape Art has become a nationwide phenomenon in the 28 years since it first started. The Citadelle Art Foundation is proud to bring this dynamic and collaborative form of art to the Texas Panhandle for the month of October. Life-sized murals created using only low-adhesive tape will temporarily adorn The Citadelle Art Foundation.

An installation of previous work.

“We are fortunate to be able to bring this group of incredible artists to our community,” says Executive Director Wendie Cook.  “This group is extremely talented and their work has been featured on some of the most prestigious landmarks in the country. To be able to share this work with the people of the Panhandle is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

There will be exciting events though out the month that the whole family will enjoy.  In addition to the events around Canadian, the muralists will be going to Spearman, Stratford, and Perryton for some educational workshops.  

History of Tape Art

Tape Art was born in Providence, Rhode Island in the 1980’s. The movement began with a collection of nightly drawings made in tape on sidewalks and in public spaces. The drawings sprawled across the landscape depicting scenes of chariots, trains, and roller coasters all rendered in life-sized silhouettes. When these works of art were finished, they were always removed within 24 hours. It wasn’t unusual to see a silhouette come to life, only to disappear when the sun came up the next day. The projects quickly grew in popularity because they made art entertaining and accessible to everyone.

A promotional installation on the police station in Amarillo.

It wasn’t long before national press picked up on the drawings and the Tape Art movement took on a life of its own. At one point, the Tape Art Crew traveled 29,000 miles in six months creating work in 40 different states. These innovative works of art have been featured on the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis, Tennessee, The Revolving Museum in Boston, Massachusetts, The CBGB Gallery in New York City, and the Cattle Depot Artist Village Residency in Hong Kong, China. The Tape Art Crew expanded their work to schools, festivals, and office buildings, teaching children and adults that creativity and imagination are not bound by age. What started out as a localized community-drawing project soon grew into a worldwide phenomenon that started a conversation about art, technology, social responsibility, and the value of teamwork.

Mark your calendar and attend these great events throughout the month of October.

You can find more information on the Citadelle’s website: CLICK HERE TO VISIT 

The Citadelle Art Foundation is a supporting organization of the Amarillo Area Foundation.

The Bright Side of the Texas Panhandle

Bad news is an abundant commodity these days. You can find it everywhere you turn. From social media, to print news, to television, to the radio, there is no shortage of sad, depressing news. So much so, we often fail to see what is occurring before our eyes. It’s easy to lose our way in the shadows of negativity. But without some brilliant light, there would be no shadows. There is always a positive light shining somewhere if we only take time to look.

We have a solution

At the Amarillo Area Foundation, we are fortunate to get a daily glimpse at the multitude of ways people across the Panhandle shine through filling needs in their communities. Every day we see people volunteering, giving of their time and financial resources. Sadly, these types of stories don’t make the news often. That is why the Amarillo Area Foundation has created The Bright Side. Each Tuesday at 6:00 PM on News Channel 10, The Bright Side will spotlight one of our fund holders in a one-minute media package courtesy of the Amarillo Area Foundation. The purpose of this endeavor is to focus on the positive news in the Texas Panhandle while helping organizations and projects gain exposure to potential donors, volunteers, and those desiring their services. By providing this service for our fund holders, we hope the positive light they are shining will be amplified for more people to see. We hope people become inspired to both be and see a shining light in their corner of the Panhandle. And, we hope even more needs are filled from the arts, to education, to human services, to healthcare.

Here’s our first two in the series:

WEEK 1
WEEK 2

A Year of Positive News

For the next year, plan to see the good works of 52 different fund holders at the Amarillo Area Foundation. May it open your eyes to the generous, positive people surrounding you in the Panhandle. May it open your mind to identifying needs in your community. May it open your heart to fulfilling those needs becoming part of the bright side of the Texas Panhandle.

Tune in each Tuesday at 6:00 PM to see The Bright Side on NewsChannel 10.

Helping After Harvey

By now the stark reality of the largest flood to ever affect our country is sinking in, and you likely feel the urge to help.  Hurricane Harvey decimated much of the Texas Coast.  Our neighbors in the Houston, Port Aransas, and Rockport areas are in dire need.  The people of the Panhandle are always characterized as willing to help, and in a disaster, that’s even more so.

So, where do you give during a tragedy this big?  That is an excellent question.  In times like these, you will see many folks, organizations, or companies create drives for those affected.  We think it’s important for you, the donor, to ask questions of those who are collecting items or money in your community.

Our sister community foundation, The Greater Houston Community Foundation (https://ghcf.org/), in conjunction with the Mayor of Houston, has set up a fund that is specifically to assist those affected by Hurricane Harvey. The GHCF does similar work in their communities that we do, and we know they are going to be helping for as long as there is a need.  You can donate to GHCF HERE

For those who would prefer to give to local organizations, here are two suggestions: 

The High Plains Food Bank (HPFB) has created a space in their warehouse specifically for donated food for the Harvey victims.  They are working with other food banks in the areas affected.  Click on this link for a list of items they are accepting:  CLICK HERE

HPFB is also taking monetary donations and sending them directly to the food banks in the affected areas.  CLICK HERE to make a donation.

The Salvation Army of Amarillo, in conjunction with Toot n’ Totum and ABC7 Amarillo, has placed red donation kettles at all Toot n’ Totum locations.  Cash donations are also accepted at the registers.  The money collected will be given to the Salvation Army in the affected areas.

The recovery from this disaster is going to be a long process, but we can band together and help those in need.

The Amarillo Area Foundation Awards over $475,000 in Scholarships

7/18/17

Contact: Broc Carter | 806.376.4521 | broc@aaf-hf.org

AMARILLO – The Amarillo Area Foundation has awarded 312 scholarships totaling $479,400 to Panhandle area students for the 2017-2018 school year.

Of the 312 scholarship awarded, 180 are for new scholarship recipients and 132 are for recipients that are continuing to receive previously awarded scholarships.  The Foundation received 3,136 applications from high school students and 108 applications from college students.  The scholarship recipients represent 23 Panhandle counties and will attend 32 different universities.

The Foundation administers 101 scholarship funds in addition to the Achievement through Commitment to Education (ACE) Scholarship program.  The Foundation’s Scholarship Selection Committee recommends recipients for 58 of the 101 non-ACE funds and local selection committees outside the Foundation recommend recipients for the remaining funds.  The Foundation manages many unique scholarships that are not only for graduating high school seniors but are also for individuals who are already college students.

”Now that the application is online, more students from the Panhandle area are accessing and applying for scholarships that are managed by the Foundation. We are proud to be investing in the future of many young Panhandle residents, both local and rural,” said Amarillo Area Foundation Vice President of Community Investment, Katharyn Wiegand.

For more information on Amarillo Area Foundation Scholarships contact scholarships@aaf-hf.org or 806-376-4521. You can also visit amarilloareafoundation.org/scholarships.

To donate or to establish a scholarship fund contact Amy Lovell, Director of Development at amy@aaf-hf.org or 806-376-4521.

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver.

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About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life for Texas Panhandle residents.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver

The Executive Director Leader Circle a Service of the Amarillo Area Foundation Nonprofit Service Center

Working in the world of nonprofit often means that Executive Directors are pulled in different directions and need to utilize many skills and talents. They are required to accomplish great things with limited funding and personnel.  Additionally, many nonprofit Executive Directors work in environments that are often isolated and stressful, straddling the space between staff, board members, donors, and the constituents they serve.  They need a support group that can provide honest assessments and ideas regarding challenges, opportunities, and frustrations.  They also need a group that can speak to unique topics of current interest that require special expertise that may be expensive and difficult to find.  In support of its goal to equip nonprofits for success through consulting, education, networking, and resources, the Amarillo Area Foundation Nonprofit Service Center provides this service to Executive Directors of nonprofit organizations.

In 2006, the Nonprofit Service Center launched a series of Leader Circles designed to benefit nonprofit professionals in the Panhandle. The Executive Director Leader Circle provides a confidential environment where nonprofit leaders can freely learn and interact with their peers.

Circle members meet mont

hly to discuss management and communications issues, board relations, fundraising, marketing, and other topics. Each meeting offers a roundtable discussion or a featured guest speaker. A vast variety of community leaders, professionals such as attorneys and accountants, business and nonprofit consultants, and business leaders and owners have shared their considerable knowledge with the circle. Annually, local attendees of the Association of Fundraising Professionals international conference are invited to address the group to share highlights from their favorite session, key takeaways, and identified trends. An experienced facilitator helps participants use the Leader Circle to identify and meet their specific needs. Participation is encouraged and each meeting is open to everything from sharing best practices to asking specific advice.

Networking time is provided before and after each meeting allowing the members to make contacts, form collaborations, and exc

hange ideas. Additionally, every month a different member is asked to provide a brief profile of their agency and the important work that they do.

The Amarillo Area Foundation Nonprofit Service Center’s goal is to provide an interactive topical experience for participants, address the hot-button issues they are facing, and collectively take advantage of and share their knowledge and experience. In a recent survey, 100% of Executive Director Leader Circle participants indicated that each month they learn something that helps them in their work at their organization.

Below are testimonials from ED Leader Circle members:

“The Executive Director Leaders Circle is a very useful tool for nonprofit executives. Boards should be aware of the value of the meetings and strongly persuade EDs to attend. The Amarillo Area Foundation does a great job in offering this resource to the community.”

“I am so happy to be involved in the group. Being the only staff person, it’s easy to feel isolated, but when I can come and network and learn with other directors I realize I have a larger support system.”

“I have been an executive director for 19 years and still learn so much during the Leader Circles from my peers. It is wonderful to find out that big or small, all of our organizations have some of the same problems.  It also brings me up to date on many of the issues facing nonprofit organizations today.”

“The Leader Circle is a meeting I look forward to attending each time. We are able to determine topics as a group that address current needs and issues. In addition to the excellent information presented, we are also able to share best practices, ideas, and peer-to-peer support.”

“It’s a lot like a unique club that meets once a month. I find it really supportive to meet other people who have similar problems and experiences and see how they handle these issues.  It also helps to understand how their boards deal with different situations.  Fundraising is always a topic and it’s great to hear how my colleagues are doing in raising funds to support their missions.”

If you feel joining the circle would positively enhance your role as a nonprofit leader or for more information please contact Roxann Ball at 806.376.4521 or roxann@aaf-hf.org,

Or you can register HERE

NLNE The Partners: Amarillo College

In this edition of “The Partners,” we sit down with Amarillo College’s Presidents, Russell Lowery-Hart.  

No Limits No Excuses: How did Amarillo College originally get involved with No Limits No Excuses?

Amarillo College: When Partners for Postsecondary Success (PPS) first came out with the Gates Grant, the Foundation pulled people together, and Amarillo College was in that room. I remember vividly seeing all the organizations in the room, talking about educational attainment, and I’m thinking, this is the opportunity for Amarillo College to integrate itself into the community more fully. I felt like people supported the College but didn’t understand it because I wasn’t sure the college had been truly responsive to all of our partners. To have a unifying goal as a community gave me great clarity where I could come back to Amarillo College and immediately start linking things that we wanted to do to the goal or redesign things to fulfill that goal.

 

It was a natural fit, immediately, and it gave a framework for our work internally, not just for the partnership. Our PPS coaches gave us a framework that we started evaluating all of our interventions against. It gave us the context of a living wage. And now, we won’t entertain starting a program that doesn’t start with a living wage or won’t lead to a living wage and a pathway.

 

NLNE: What has kept AC’s involvement through this five-year process?

AC: Because it’s made us better. It helped us understand our students more fully so that we could serve the students we have, not the students we wish we had or thought we had. It’s integrated us with other partners like AISD, Workforce Solutions, and the ACE program.

I feel like we’re all unified because we’re all working toward the same goal.  Before No Limits, No Excuses, we all had individual goals that weren’t aligned. So, we keep coming back because the partnerships generate new approaches and more effective outcomes for our students.

 

NLNE: How has the partnership increased your relationships with other institutions, and what do those look like now?

AC: Well, in some really tangible ways. Workforce Solutions now has an employee that they pay that is housed in our career center and we share their software.  We can take someone that Workforce Solutions is serving, find them a job and put them in an academic or certificate program simultaneously. So, it’s integrating effort, and that’s the best example of what’s happened through this partnership.

NLNE: I always say this when I’m talking about NLNE, it’s obvious that Amarillo College, Amarillo ISD, and WT had a relationship prior to NLNE.  However, It seems like the intentionality of the relationships brought on by NLNE, and sitting in the same room and having conversations, is really the genesis of success and culture change for No Limits, No Excuses.

AC: We have a shared goal and have developed more trust.  We’re sharing data to support that shared goal, and when you have that, you don’t see yourselves as competitors. We’ve worked together before NLNE, but I don’t think we worked together as effectively. We saw each other as competition, and I think that has completely subsided.  NLNE partner employees are working at the same table to design programs and in NLNE work groups to better serve our community. You build relationships that build trust that build integrated services.  I love the partnership that we have, and I love the relationship that the three most important educational entities in our community have as a result of NLNE.

 

NLNE: What changes in culture in regards to universal achievement have you seen?

AC: One is a complete focus on data. We used to worship the anecdotal, and take the anecdotal as the gospel for every student. So, if we had one student from Palo Duro High School that came to AC and transferred to WT, and then got a job on Wall Street, then it proved how amazing we were when we had a whole swath of students that didn’t have that same experience.

Universal achievement forced us to focus on the “universal” part of achievement and not cherry-pick the stories we liked. We needed to own the stories we didn’t like, and then to put data to it and do system analysis of it – this process has truly been transformative for us. But if you want to take credit for that person’s success, you also have to take the blame for a student’s failure. Before the No Excuses approach to our work as an institution and as a community, we didn’t want to take ownership of our students’ failures.

Our big marketing push right now is “Success IS …” , and we’re trying to highlight students that have gone through Amarillo College, maybe went on to WT and then worked in this community. If we’re going to change the future of the community,

we have got to stop talking about success as getting out. Success is not defined by getting out. Success is defined by getting a degree and a job and staying in.

 

NLNE: What role does Amarillo College play in or serve as a partner?

AC: I’m probably not the person to ask that question. I think in a lot of ways, we can help the partnership glue things together. We are the glue between the ISD high school graduate and the bachelor’s degree. We’re the glue between the ISD and the workforce, and I feel that pressure, and I need my colleagues in Amarillo College to feel that pressure. We say Amarillo is only as strong as its college because if we can serve this partnership with this community successfully, everybody is going to be successful.  But if we can’t, then the whole community loses and that keeps me up at night.

NLNE: What does the future look like for education, post-secondary education in the workforce?

AC: It has to look different than it does now. It has to be… more seamless. There will be more focused on giving students pathways to options. But for a community college, we need to be a gateway for opportunity, and so, we need to give students a foundational understanding of what their options are, but they don’t necessarily have to define those options here. They need to find them at WT or at Tech, or wherever they go.

 

NLNE: What impact has NLNE had on your organization, culturally and physically?

AC: Culturally, I think it’s given us more confidence in our place in the community. We understand our role more fully and have embraced it and are excited about it. Structurally and philosophically, it’s had an enormous impact on Amarillo College. It gave us a no excuses philosophy; it connected us to the No Excuses University.

 

NLNE:    Define “no excuses”.

AC: For me, that means that at Amarillo College, every student has the opportunity to succeed because we’ve built systems for them to be successful. But when they’re not successful, we don’t have any excuses for that failure. It means we didn’t have the right person, the right policy, the right support or the right process in place to ensure that success. We have to give students opportunity without limits. But we can’t have excuses for lack of achievement, and we used to swim in those excuses: demographics, first-generation status, income level, test scores. Those are influences that are essential to understanding, but they’re not excuses anymore.

So, for us, that’s changed our philosophy but it’s structurally changed us as well.  Without No Limits, No Excuses, we wouldn’t have a Career Center, food pantries, clothing closets and an entire systemic approach to social services.  We wouldn’t have a coach’s champions program, a Money Management Center, the Texas Workforce Commission, and a Workforce Solutions office on our campus, jointly serving students.

We would just be a typical community college without the partnerships, and now we’re a place that’s really special.

 

NLNE: What impact have you seen No Limits, No Excuses have on the community?

AC: Here’s what I love – I think that it’s had a real impact on understanding what our education attainment levels are, and why everyone should care about them.  Why it affects everyone on a personal level, and that, instead of memorializing the demographic shifts that are happening, and the growth of poverty, we can make a collective impact and redefine and redirect the future of this community, and we can do it together, and only together.

 

NLNE: How would you characterize success for No Limits, No Excuses?

AC: I think success for No Limits, No Excuses is when Amarillo Colleges gets to a 70 percent completion rate, because it’ll take the community to make that happen. Success is when there is a more diversified economy because we have an educated workforce to support it. Success is when poverty rates go down and more of our citizens are in a living wage. Success is when our property values go up because there is a broader part of this community that’s supporting the infrastructure that we need to grow.

 

NLNE: What other thoughts do you have about No Limits, No Excuses?

AC: The shift for me in NLNE from 2009 when we started talking about this collective impact to 2017 is that, when I think about the organizations that are a part of the partnership, before I just thought about them as organizations in our community that we either had to work through or work around, and now, I see friends that are trying to help me fulfil my mission

 

 

Alone We Can Do Little, Together We Can Do Much!

It is no secret that when women choose to work together, great feats can be accomplished. The Women’s Philanthropy Fund is a shining example of this. In 2008, the Amarillo Area Foundation and a group of highly motivated women established the Women’s Philanthropy Fund to demonstrate that by combining their contributions, they could provide solutions to ongoing challenges. Since 2009, 168 women have provided contributions totaling more than $475,000 and have granted $290,000 to 31 nonprofit organizations for the benefit of women, children, and families.

“The Women’s Philanthropy Fund is unique in its use of pooled funds to empower organizations to make new programs possible and take existing programs to the next level. Grants from the fund make real and lasting differences in the lives of women and children the Texas Panhandle,” states Carolina Walden, Women’s Philanthropy Fund Advisory Board member. And there are no signs of slowing down. Women’s Philanthropy Fund members hold a firm belief that women and children play a vital role in our community and empowering them is crucial to the wellbeing of the entire population of the Texas Panhandle. When one woman succeeds or one child prospers, everyone benefits.

Grant recipients are not the only people who benefit from the Women’s Philanthropy Fund. Each year, members of the Women’s Philanthropy Fund have the opportunity to come together and make the decision of which organizations will receive grants from the money these individual women have pooled together. Through this process, friendships are forged, experience is gained, and education about the needs in our area as well as the organizations that provide help is obtained. Lizzie Mason, Women’s Philanthropy Fund Advisory Board member, says it best, “The Women’s Philanthropy membership is made up of a dynamic group of women who want to do good in the Texas Panhandle. I love being a part of this group because we learn about so many different needs involving women and children in our community, and we actually help them!”

If you would like to make a difference and improve quality of life for women and children, we invite you to join us as a member in 2017 as we expand our voice throughout the Texas Panhandle. Women 39 and under can join with a Silver Membership for $500 annually. The Gold Membership is $1000 annually, and arrangements can be made for any membership to be paid out monthly. However, your charitable membership contribution is due by July 31, 2017, to allow voting on grants at the September 14th meeting. Please contact Amy Lovell, at 806-376-4521 or amy@aaf-hf.org with any questions. For further information, please visit our website at https://www.amarilloareafoundation.org/WPF.

If you would like to join now, CLICK HERE. After DESIGNATION, select Women’s Philanthropy Fund from the drop-down menu.

To view a list of organizations who have benefited from the Women’s Philanthropy Fund in the past, please Click Here.