The AAF Community Health Foundation Awards $83,000 in Grants to Healthcare Projects throughout the Panhandle



Tuesday, October 26, 2016

AMARILLO – The Board of Directors of the AAF Community Health Foundation, doing business as the Harrington Regional Medical Campus (HRMC), have awarded a total of $83,000 to seven nonprofit organizations and five institutions of higher learning in their first grant cycle.  HRMC is a supporting organization of the Amarillo Area Foundation and its mission is to promote quality of life in the Texas Panhandle through exceptional healthcare, education, and research.

The Amarillo Botanical Gardens, Don Harrington Discovery Center, and Ronald McDonald House are residents of the Harrington Medical Campus and received support for capital projects. Arrow Child & Family Ministries, Downtown Women’s Center, Hansford County Hospital District, and the West Texas A&M University Foundation received funds from the HRMC Community Health Grant Program for capital or program related expenses.

Full list of recipients is available here.

The Hansford County Hospital District received the largest grant. They were awarded $15,000 to certify Registered Nurses as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and train more EMTs in order to ensure that necessary staff are available and properly trained to transfer patients to a higher level of care when needed.  The project will reduce long Emergency Room transfer times and unnecessary transfers by flight.

Amarillo College, Clarendon Community College, Frank Phillips Community College, Texas Tech University, and West Texas A&M University received funds for scholarships to area students and professionals pursuing healthcare related education. Scholarship recipients must demonstrate a commitment to locate in the region and contribute to area communities.

Organizations may only submit one grant application per twelve month period to the HRMC Community Health Program; however, receiving an HRMC grant does not affect eligibility for Amarillo Area Foundation discretionary and other competitive grants. HRMC Grant Program applications are anticipated to reopen in the summer of 2017 and will be due at noon on September 1, 2017.

Please contact or call 806-376-4521 with questions.

About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver

The New Face of ACE


ACE students have completed more than 1,374 certificates and degrees and are a projected to return $2.6 billion in lifetime earnings to Amarillo’s economy.

One of the most powerful features of the ACE Scholarship Program is its ability to leverage outside sources of financial aid.  Since ACE assists students in obtaining federal, state, and local grants and scholarships, we are able to send students to college for an average cost of $1,200 per year. The ability to leverage outside aid makes ACE an excellent educational investment in Amarillo students.

As we look forward to another 20 years of assisting ACE scholars, we are asking for your help in supporting the educational aspirations of our students.  Your $100 a month actually sends a child to college through the ACE program. Will you be a face of ACE?

Meet our current ACE supporters.

Meet Christopher, an ACE student.

Visit to become a face of ACE today.


She Gives: Lindsey Murphy


Hello to all the She Giver’s out there. (We are talking to you too, men).

“She Givers” are both male and female readers interested in supporting the driven women in their lives who are dedicated to making a difference. We know there are lots of you out there because the readership for this new column continues to flourish with every edition. We are so pleased you are finding the topics and stories covered meaningful and even more pleased to share our interview with Lindsey Murphy with you in this third edition of the column.

Murphy, the Vice President of Marketing for Education Credit Union, was a top 20 under 40 honoree for 2015. In other words, she will may make you feel inadequate about all things you are not doing that you could be doing. So, for those of you who need a fire lit under you to complete those yearend goals, make sure to click “continue reading” below. For those of you interested in reading about a woman committed to living a life of deep fulfillment, purpose, and service, click “continue reading,” too. Murphy is such a delight and absolute treat to have as a guest this quarter.

Olivia Trabysh: You serve on five boards? Could you list them and explain how or why you chose to get involved with each of them?

Lindsey Murphy: It’s actually six now (laughs). I am on the board of (1) Martha’s Home; (2) Coffee Memorial Blood Center; (3) American Advertising Federation – Amarillo; (4) Canyon Chamber of Commerce; (5) Panhandle PBS; and (6) Arden Road PTA.

Growing up, my Mom’s heart was for blood donation. I was always in the waiting room at Coffee Memorial while she donated. I grew up watching her give. The second I turned 18 that’s what I did. My Dad had a passion for United Way. When he was involved with campaigns or fundraisers for them he would explain to me why he was involved and why we had to help. When I got a “big girl job” I immediately started donating to the United Way because that’s simply what I thought adults did. But the older I got the more aware I became about the many ways to be involved and give back.

My junior year in college I met Melissa Chapman-Smith, the then Executive Director of Martha’s Home. She helped shift my philanthropic mindset to include giving more than just monetarily. She opened my eyes to what it means to donate your time and understanding what donating your time affords. Donating money is important and always appreciated, but donating time is invaluable. (Laughs)… so when my daughter was two weeks old (emphasis on the two weeks old), I joined the Martha’s Home Board of Directors, because I have such a passion for homeless women and children.

The strategic planning and steering of a nonprofit organization does so much good. When my Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer, and after learning what I did on the Board at Martha’s Home, I couldn’t only donate blood in my Mom’s name anymore. I applied to be on the Board of Coffee Memorial in her honor.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

Murphy going over the edge for Coffee Memorial Blood Center.

2015 was supposed to be the year of “no,” but it quickly became the year of “yes.” I joined each of the other boards I currently serve on, and they all deal with many different causes I am passionate about. I am constantly learning so much. But six is my limit.  Pro-tip: If you don’t know your limit, your family will tell you (laughs).

Trabysh: Serving on six nonprofit boards obviously takes up a significant amount of time. Why do you feel it is important to serve the community in addition to your job? And how does your employer assist you in being able to provide outreach to so many parts of the community?

Murphy: There’s just so much more out there to do other than your job. I grew up in the Sleepy Hollow area but applied to be a part of the magnet program at Sam Houston in middle school. I witnessed obvious class division and many differences from what I was accustomed to seeing on my side of town. I learned to love people as people. I just have a servant’s heart.

The Credit Union is incredibly supportive of the benevolent aspect of my personality. They are flexible and allow me to attend board meetings and events during the work day. They also monetarily support nonprofits organizations I am on the board of. The Credit Union supports all of the boards and causes our management team is involved with. They truly believe in the work each member of the management team does for our community and support our efforts.

In 2013-2014 I was given the opportunity to go through Leadership Amarillo and Canyon with my son. The Credit Union sponsored my training and sponsored my son’s, too. They normally sponsor training for a few employees and students in the community. It was really cool not only to receive the training, but to bond that way with my son doing something so profound and then be able to credit the experience to my employer.

Trabysh: That is such a cool thing for your employer to do and I think that is especially important for our younger working women or women contemplating a career change to hear. It is possible to work for an employer that is supportive of your passions and your family. So, time for some lightening round questions. Who are the people that support you the most?

Murphy: My husband! He is the kindest, most patient, loving man on the planet. He helps me find that even level of balance. I would not be able to do what I do if he wasn’t willing to help run our daughter to soccer practice and cheerleading. He also doesn’t mind throwing on a suit and tie to be “my arm candy” for the night to support causes and people I care about. He is always there to support me.

The precious Murphey family.

Murphy family

I really strive for volunteerism to be a way of life for our family. We make volunteer events a family affair. It’s also a way to get friends involved. I am able to spend quality time with people I love and also dedicate that time towards a great purpose. I guess I pass on that spirit of volunteerism to them like my parents did to me without even really meaning to.

Trabysh: Who are the people that inspire you the most?

Murphy: Melissa Chapman-Smith.  My parents – they are the foundation for all of this. Sallye Barnes. She will do anything. She’s the go-to-friend for hot glue parties and last minute dates.

The sheer amount of work that needs to be done inspires me.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha's Home Second Chance Prom.

Murphy with go-to pal, Sallye Barnes at Martha’s Home Second Chance Prom.


Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Murphy hosting Panhandle PBS Pledge Night.

Trabysh: What matters the most to you?

Murphy: When I can go home and go to bed every night.  I can sleep soundly if I know I did a good job at work, I fulfilled the mission of whatever nonprofit organizations I served that day, and I spent quality time with my family. It’s a sense of accomplishment and love for my community and the people in it.

Trabysh: What are the causes that you think are in most-dire need of attention in our community?

Murphy: Homelessness is so urgent and so present; we can’t look the other way anymore. We must work together to fix it – it is not going away on its own.

I want to teach people to not to be so absorbed in their day to day lives.  A tiny little prick can save lives – so go donate blood! There are too many people who bury their heads in the sand and think our community’s struggles will magically take care of themselves. People must be willing to make things happen. If not me, than who?

Bryan Clontz on Creative Charitable Planning

2016_newsletter_q3_creativeImagine being able to increase the size of the gifts from your donors each year. Yet, the net cost of their donations were 40-60% less than what they were giving to you. Essentially, your programs and operations are secure from increased donations and your donors keep more money in their pockets. Sound too good to be true?

It’s actually not, and surprisingly the ability to maximize charitable gifts in such a monumental way is a tactic of the past. Non-cash assets have been incentivized by the government since 1969 but very few people understand what they are or how they work.

To better explain the concept for the benefit of Amarillo Area nonprofits and all the constituents they organizations serve, the Amarillo Area Foundation and the Amarillo Area Estate Planning Council teamed up to bring in charitable expert Bryan Clontz to help decode this mystery.

Clontz, President of Charitable Solutions, LLC spent the morning with nonprofit professionals. He taught them what non-cash assets were and how to ask for and incorporate non-cash assets (ideally appreciated stock) into their planned giving models. Clontz then opened the afternoon with a session for financial planners, CPAs, and attorneys. By informing the people who advise large donors in our area, we are increasing awareness related to the benefits associated with giving non-cash assets which maximize contributions to our area and the impact those contributions have.

Clontz closed the day with a special presentation to the AAF Board of Directors teaching members their role as key stakeholders and empowering them to act as extensions of the Foundation when asking for non-cash assets and even consider giving non-cash assets of their own.

Thanks to Clontz we all have plenty of information to take back to our organizations and communities. Now working together more informed and smarter, empowered to even further improve quality for Texas Panhandle residents.

Bryan Clontz speaking to nonprofit professionals on October 6, 2016.

Bryan Clontz speaking to nonprofit professionals at the Foundation on October 6, 2016.

If you missed the event and are interested in learning more about what Bryan had to say, check out this brief video posted by our friends at the Gulf Coast Community Foundation:

To further your knowledge on the realm of non-cash donations you can also check out Bryan’s website:

In honor of Charlotte’s Retirement



Charlotte Rhodes, ACFRE

With much regret but the warmest of wishes we announced Charlotte’s decision to retire a few weeks ago. Given the breadth of the work Charlotte has done for the Foundation and the enormous void that will be present in her absence, we would like to take this time to highlight Charlotte’s greatest accomplishments as Vice President of Resource Development and Sustainability.

In her 11-year tenure at the Foundation, Charlotte cultivated an annual average of $10 million per year, and over $100 million total. She established countless programs and committees, the most notable of which being the Foundation’s External Relations Committee which focuses on the engagement of the Foundation with local and area leaders; the Women’s Philanthropy Program, a donor driven fund designed to meet the needs of children and women in the Texas Panhandle; a Professional Advisor Council, a group of lawyers, accountants and other professionals who provide recommendations and review the Foundation’s fundraising and legal strategies; and the Texas Convening Conferences for Postsecondary Education which gather key educators and legislators from across the state to discuss issues faced by high school and collegiate students across the state.

Charlotte has also lead or donated her expertise to make many programs and initiatives successful. Most notably she led the $5 million ACE Scholarship Expansion Campaign and oversaw the development of a $3.5 million grant from the Belinda and Melinda Gates Foundation to begin the No Limits No Excuses program. She also expanded the Nonprofit Service Center’s consulting program and fundraising classes and facilitated the development of the Citadelle Art Foundation and its conversion as a supporting organization of the Amarillo Area Foundation.

In addition to raising over $100 million for the Foundation, Charlotte has raised over $1 billion in her 40-year career as a fundraiser. An assortment of her most notable campaigns being the Don and Sybil Harrington Cancer Center Capital Campaign, Baylor College of Medicine $500 million Capital Campaign, National Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, Amarillo Globe News Center for the Performing Arts, Oklahoma City Symphony Orchestra, Charles Goodnight Historical Home, Hereford Sports Plex, and most recently the Texas Panhandle War Memorial Education Center.

Charlotte is truly a big city fundraiser with West Texas roots. In 1999, Big Spring Texas High School awarded her with the Outstanding Alumni Award. She received the Outstanding Fundraising Executive Award for Houston, Texas in 2002 before she even received the Outstanding Fundraising Executive Award for Amarillo, Texas in 2005 and Amarillo Junior League Outstanding Sustaining Member. Charlotte was honored by the Amarillo Soroptimists as a “Woman Making and Difference” and by the Business and Professional Women as “Texas Women to Watch.” She currently serves as the Committee Chairman for the Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Coalition and was co-chairman for the 2016 Texas Women for the Arts State Meeting.

In addition to her impressive contributions to healthcare, the arts, education and public affairs Charlotte is a published writer and has served as a regional and national consultant for over 50 institutions, organizations, and corporations. We adore Charlotte and know she is equally adored by our community. Please help us in the coming months by celebrating her and thanking her for her service to our community.

We will miss you Charlotte!

The Amarillo Area Foundation Kicks Off the Second Half of 2016 by Awarding an Additional $900,000 to Area Nonprofits


Tuesday, September 12, 2016

AMARILLO – The Board of Directors of the Amarillo Area Foundation, and its supporting organization The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation, have awarded $906,836 in grants with their general grantmaking funds.

Ten Amarillo area nonprofit organizations were approved for funding with discretionary grantmaking dollars. Over half of the projects supported in this discretionary grant cycle were health focused. The largest award was a $373,000 grant contributing to the construction of a residential alcohol and drug recovery center in Amarillo.

President and CEO, Clay Stribling said, “We are very pleased with the response to our grants programs for 2016. The quality of applications, particularly for healthcare projects, was extremely high.”

Amarillo Area Foundation’s newest grant making program, The Catalyst Grant program, awarded small grants between $5,000-$14,000 to five nonprofit organizations with projects focusing on education, health, and human services.

“The Catalyst Grant program provides an easier application process for smaller grant amounts while engaging young community members across the Panhandle through the review process. Receiving 18 applications during the first grant cycle indicates we are on the right track for enhancing our grant offerings,” said Katharyn Wiegand, Vice President of Community Engagement.

The final Amarillo Area Foundation and The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation discretionary grant cycle for 2016 is now open. Nonprofits with moderate grant requests (not to exceed $50,000) are encouraged to apply.  Due to the shortened grant cycle, please contact Kathie Grant, Grants Administrator (376.4521 or if your organization plans to apply.

In addition, the newly formed Catalyst Grant program, which provides grant awards from $2,500 to $20,000 for programs and projects that fall within the Foundation focus areas, is also accepting applications. There is a special focus in the Catalyst Grant program on capacity building and general operating requests. Please visit our blog to view the full RFP. You can do so here:

About the Amarillo Area Foundation

The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life in the Texas Panhandle.  Since its inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and a variety of other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver.

The full list of recipients is available here.


for_immediate_release_actual_-copyEach year, the Amarillo Area Foundation and its supporting organization, The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation, consider grant requests from charitable organizations located within the northernmost 26 counties of Texas.  The application process is competitive and charitable organizations located within the Texas Panhandle are encouraged to apply.  (Individuals and non-charitable agencies are not eligible to apply for funding.)  Grant applications are considered by the Amarillo Area Foundation and its supporting organization, The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation, via a single application.  The Harrington Foundation does not receive grant requests directly from nonprofit organizations.

The Amarillo Area Foundation and The Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation have limited Discretionary Grant funds that remain unallocated for 2016.  Nonprofits with moderate grant requests (not to exceed $50,000) are encouraged to apply.  Due to the shortened grant cycle, please contact Kathie Grant, Grants Administrator (376.4521 or if your organization plans to apply.

In addition, the newly formed Catalyst Grant program, which provides grant awards from $2,500 to $20,000 for programs and projects that fall within the Foundation focus areas, is also accepting applications.  (Please note, organizations who seek grant funding in excess of $20,000 will continue to utilize the Discretionary Grant application.)  There is a special focus in the Catalyst Grant program on capacity building and general operating requests.

An organization may only submit a grant application to the Amarillo Area Foundation once per twelve-month period and must choose to submit either a Catalyst Grant application or a Discretionary Grant application.  In addition, any reporting requirements of a previous Foundation grant must be fulfilled before an organization is eligible to apply.  Visit and click on ‘Foundation Grant Programs’ for guidelines and priorities. The deadline for both programs is October 24, 2016, at 12:00 noon.  Decisions for funding will be made in early December 2016.

Applications must be submitted through the online portal  Please click on the ‘Application’ page of the grants page to get more information about the Spectrum Portal and the application process. Upon submission, applications and accompanying materials become the property of the Foundation and are used as deemed appropriate.  These materials may be reviewed with others as part of the assessment process.  Information may also be shared with other foundations and funding sources that call for information about community projects.

ClICK HERE for RFP as a document.


The Amarillo Area Foundation is a community foundation that serves the northernmost 26 counties of the Texas Panhandle.  The mission of the Foundation is to improve the quality of life for residents in the Texas Panhandle.  Since inception in 1957, the Foundation has provided grants and other services to strengthen nonprofit organizations and the services they deliver.

Amarillo Area Foundation Announces Completion of ACE Expansion Campaign

Blog_headerWednesday, August 31, 2016

AMARILLO, TX – In 2009, the Amarillo Area Foundation made a commitment to grow the ACE Endowment by $5 million. Growing the endowment allowed the ACE program to expand its outreach to three elementary schools in the Tasocsa High School cluster. Fifth graders attending Bivins, Margaret Wills, and San Jacinto elementary schools are now eligible for ACE scholarship funds if they enter Tascosa in their freshman year and maintain the program requirements for grades, attendance, and behavior.

This past May, 39 Tascosa seniors graduated ACE eligible, joining 154 of their ACE colleagues from Palo Duro and 192 ACE graduates from Caprock High School. Roya and Sheida Jaberiandoraji were the first two Tascosa ACE graduates.  Both girls completed high school in two years and began their college career at Amarillo College in 2014.  They are currently studying at West Texas A&M University this fall.

Since the first graduating class of ACE students in 1998, more than 4,800 students have graduated ACE eligible, 3,267 have attended college on an ACE scholarship, and 1,374 have earned a college degree or postsecondary certificate. Almost $6.5 million has been awarded in ACE scholarships and the Amarillo Area Foundation has helped students obtain more than $16 million in federal funding and other scholarship funds. ACE students have a wealth of resources to assist them in their postsecondary pursuits because of the dedication of ACE donors.

More than 2,000 donors have made gifts to ACE totaling over $9.9 million since the inception of the program in 1994. Individuals, corporations, and foundations made diligent efforts to provide lasting impact in the lives of ACE students and their families and also in the social and economic prosperity of the Amarillo community.

A special gift was made in honor of Robin Gilliland Weir by her husband, David Weir, to finalize the expansion. Gilliland Weir was Co-Chair of the ACE Campaign with Allen Durrett. Gilliland Weir commented, “I am so proud of our community for creating and funding ACE for 22 years. I have always loved this program because of how many lives it has touched.  To educate the youth of our community is a win/win for all of us!”

For Gilliland Weir, giving to ACE was also a familial legacy. “My parents have been donors to ACE since it began at Palo Duro and set an example of the importance of helping others to break down the barriers to a college education.  My husband is also a donor and is so understanding and supportive of the students who face challenges to postsecondary education.”

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Toolbox for Fundraisers

tookbox_graphic As the number of nonprofit organizations increases each year, the ability to create and nurture relationships with donors is critical.  Fundraising can be a daunting task if you are not sure where to start or how to stay on track.

For more than 20 years, local fundraising professionals have shared their expertise through a course originally titled “The Art of Fundraising”.  The course is updated each year to include current trends and information and is now known as “Toolbox for Fundraisers”.

The 2016 Toolbox for Fundraisers course will provide detailed materials and instruction from fundraising professionals with more than 88 years of combined fundraising experience:

Charlotte Rhodes, ACFRE     Patricia A. Ward, CFRE     Katharyn Wiegand, CFRE

Presented  the Amarillo Area Foundation’s Nonprofit Service Center, Toolbox for Fundraisers course topics include:

*                Essential Tools to be an Effective Fundraiser

*                Establishing a Development Office

*                Creating a Case for Support

*                Constructing a Development Plan

*                Marketing Your Organization

*                Making the Ask

*                Stewarding Donors

*                Preparing for Your CFRE Certification

Upon successful completion of the course, each participant will have developed a case for support and a development plan for the organization of his/her choice.

The course is presented in weekly sessions from 9:00 AM to noon on Wednesdays from September 7, 2016 through November 16, 2016.  Sessions are held at the Amarillo Area Foundation – 801 S. Fillmore, 7th floor.

Participants who successfully complete the 33 hour course will receive 3.30 continuing education credits (CEUs) through Amarillo College.  This course also meets the requirements for those seeking credit hours for the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation.

The course fee is $250 for members of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and $295 for all others.

To reserve a spot for the fall 2016 course, contact Roxann Ball by phone (806.376.4521) or e-mail ( by September 2, 2016.toolbox_topics

Dugger Legacy Continues Through Scholarship Fund


AMARILLO, TX – The Amarillo Area Foundation is the benefactor of a major gift from Bus and Freda Dugger in the amount of $1 million. The gift, finalized after Bus Dugger’s passing in April of this year, will establish an endowed scholarship fund for juniors and seniors attending West Texas A&M University. It is the largest principal scholarship gift designated specifically for high school students from the Texas Panhandle the Foundation has ever received.

Born, raised, and originally educated in Oklahoma, Dugger’s career in sales brought him to Amarillo where he met Cal Farley. Dugger and Farley formed Kids Inc., Amarillo’s youth sports organization, in 1945.  While garnering support for Kids Inc. from Glenwood Elementary’s PTA, Bus met his wife, Freda – an Amarillo native and music teacher. They married in March of the same year.

The Dugger’s were strongly connected to our local Panhandle postsecondary institutions. Freda began her education at Amarillo Junior College and finished with a Master’s in Education from West Texas State University. Bus completed his Bachelor’s and Masters at West Texas A&M University in 1955 and 1956, respectively.

Both Freda and Bus were educators themselves. Freda taught in Enid and Shallowater as well Humphrey’s Highland and Forest Hill once she and Bus returned to Amarillo. Bus was the Supervisor of Adult Education at Amarillo College from 1961-1966 until Cal Farley convinced Bus to take a position at Boy’s Ranch. Bus stayed at Boys Ranch until his retirement in 1982.

Bus was inducted as the 137th member to the Texas Panhandle Sports Hall of Fame for his work with Kids Inc. and his role as a basketball and football official for high school, college, and the NIBL for 33 years.

Kids Inc. President & CEO Jimmy Lackey, a close friend of the Duggers, had this to say about the intent behind their gift to AAF: “Mr. and Mrs. Dugger were unable to have children of their own. This scholarship endowment is their way of extending their genuine care for young people that will provide educational opportunities for students from the Texas Panhandle from now on. What a gift.”

College juniors and seniors with a 3.0 GPA attending or planning to attend West Texas A&M University who completed high school in the 26 northernmost counties of the Texas Panhandle are eligible to apply for the $2,000 annual scholarship. The scholarship is renewable for two consecutive semesters for college juniors.

To apply for the Dugger Scholarship please visit Our general scholarship application for the 2017-2018 academic year will open on November 1, 2016 and close on February 10, 2017 at 12:00pm.

To donate to the CC “Bus” and Freda Dugger Endowed Scholarship Fund please contact Kasey Long, Director of Development, by email or phone 806-476-4521.